Do Democrats Need to Stop Talking About Climate, Immigration, and Policing?

Do Democrats Need to Stop Talking About Climate, Immigration, and Policing?

John Nichols says no, plus Melina Abdullah on the LAPD, and Ray Suarez on the new podcast Going for Broke.

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Some pundits say the only way Democrats can hold the House and Senate in 2022 is by appealing to swing voters in Republican states by talking about economic issues—and not talking about climate change, immigration reform, or policing. John Nichols challenges that argument.

Also: The cofounder of Black Lives Matter LA, Melina Abdullah, talks about the LAPD, and how they showed up, in force, at her house twice in the week since she filed a lawsuit over a similar incident last year. We call it “SWATting,” and we also call it retaliation.

And The Nation and the Economic Hardship Reporting Project are launching a new podcast: Going for Broke, personal stories about how the pandemic made it a lot harder for working class people to pay the rent, stay in their homes, or find a new job. Host Ray Suarez provides a preview—he’s best known for his work on NPR and PBS. The podcast launches on October 18 and you can subscribe now here.

Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: thenation.com/podcastsubscribe.

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