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The Nation

The Nation is America’s oldest weekly news magazine, and one of the most widely read magazines in the world for politics, news and culture.


  • May 3, 2007

    Republican vs. Republican on Iraq

    On Monday a Washington Post headline read: "GOP's Base Helps Keep Unity on Iraq." By Thursday, following President Bush's veto of a Democratic war funding bill, the long-suppressed GOP divide on the war was spilling out into the open.

    Most Republicans still oppose setting a timetable for withdrawal and only four in the Congress voted for the Democratic proposal. But now they are split on the question of "benchmarks"--whether to require Iraqis to meet certain political goals in order to keep receiving US military support.

    "Obviously, the president would prefer a straight funding bill with no benchmarks, no conditions, no reports," said Senator Susan Collins of Maine told the Los Angeles Times. "Many of us, on both sides of the aisle, don't see that as viable."

    The Nation

  • May 3, 2007

    Is There Freedom After Hip-Hop?

    Hip-hop has influenced nearly every art form today, but has it been able to liberate? Artists, musicians and intellectuals reflect on the past and the future of hip-hop.

    The Nation

  • May 3, 2007

    Heroes in Razorblade City

    A trio of Portland rappers put their boots to the ground and educate the next generation in the art of socially conscious hip-hop.

    The Nation

  • May 3, 2007

    Discovery/The Nation ’07 Prizewinners

    Four previously unpublished poets are honored as winners of Discovery/The Nation 07, the annual Joan Leiman Jacobson Poetry Prize of The Unterberg Poetry Center.

    The Nation


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  • April 30, 2007

  • April 30, 2007

    The New Cold War

    Doesn't it feel like a new cold war out there?

    Condi Rice has taken off those dominatrix black boots and slipped into dark cold war terminology: "The idea that somehow 10 interceptors and a few radars in Eastern Europe are going to threaten the Soviet strategic deterrent is purely ludicrous, and everybody knows it," she said speaking in Oslo last week at a gathering of diplomats from NATO countries.

    The Russians don't see it quite the same way. And last week, Russian President Vladimir Putin suspended his nation's compliance with a treaty on conventional weapons in Europe that was created at the end of the cold war. The decision, fueled by the Kremlin's anger at the US's proposal to build this new missile defense system in Europe, is just another sign of how much has been squandered since the Cold War was officially declared "kaput" in Malta in 1989 at the summit between George Bush I and Mikhail Gorbachev.

    The Nation


  • April 27, 2007