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Chris Hayes

Editor at Large

Chris Hayes, Editor-at-Large of The Nation, hosts “All In with Chris Hayes” at 8 p.m. ET Monday through Friday on MSNBC.

Previously, Hayes hosted the weekend program “Up w/ Chris Hayes,” which premiered in 2011. Prior to joining MSNBC as an anchor, Chris had previously served as a frequent substitute host for “The Rachel Maddow Show” and “The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell.” Chris became a MSNBC contributor in 2010 and has been with The Nation since 2007.

He is a former Fellow at Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics. From 2008-2010, he was a Bernard Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation. From 2005 to 2006, Chris was a Schumann Center Writing Fellow at In These Times.

Since 2002, Hayes has written on a wide variety of political and social issues, from union organizing and economic democracy, to the intersection of politics and technology. His essays, articles and reviews have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The Nation, The American Prospect, The New Republic, The Washington Monthly, the Guardian, and The Chicago Reader.

He is the author of two books, A Colony in a Nation (W.W. Norton & Company, 2017) and Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy (Crown Publishing Group, 2012)Chris grew up in the Bronx, graduated from Brown University in 2001 with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy.


  • March 6, 2008

    Mental Health Parity Passes the House

    H.R. 1424, the Paul Wellstone Mental Health and Addiction Equity Act passed the house. Long overdue.

    Chris Hayes

  • March 6, 2008

    Free Trade

    Yes, there is nothing more excellent than the United States vaunted Free Trade Regime.

    Chris Hayes

  • March 5, 2008

    Afghanistan on the Burner

    Here's a bit of nostalgia for the past: In 2003, we worried because Afghanistan was cultivating 80,000 hectares of opium. Now that figure is 200,000, and Afghanistan accounts for fully 93% of the world's opium supply. What's a State Department to do? Deprive farmers of their only source of income? Or focus on other issues--like the fact that security's deteriorated to the point that President Karzai only controls 30 percent of the country? (Unless, wait: aren't those pesky narcodollars the reason we're having trouble with narcoterrorists in the first place?)

    You make the call. In the meantime, consider the fact that our current ambassador to Afghanistan just arrived from another beneficiary of U.S. crop eradication--Colombia--one fair signal of the State Department's plans.

    Chris Hayes

  • March 5, 2008

    Bush Comes Clean

    Why we really need telecom immunity:

    1). It's our way of saying thank you, and 2)., More to the point: as Bush put it at last week's press conference, "The litigation process could lead to the disclosure of information about how we conduct surveillance." A grim prospect not for the telecom companies, but for the White House. Glenn Greenwald sums it up:

    The telecom lawsuits are...the last hope for ever having this still-secret behavior subjected to the rule of law and enabling the American people to learn about what their Government did for years in illegally spying on them. That's why -- the only real reason -- the White House is so desperate for telecom amnesty.

    Chris Hayes


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  • March 4, 2008

    Is This Seat Taken?

    The first clue that Comcast had paid seat-fillers to keep people out of the FCC hearing might've been when several attendees started snoring....

    Chris Hayes


  • March 4, 2008