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Chris Hayes

Editor at Large

Chris Hayes, Editor-at-Large of The Nation, hosts “All In with Chris Hayes” at 8 p.m. ET Monday through Friday on MSNBC.

Previously, Hayes hosted the weekend program “Up w/ Chris Hayes,” which premiered in 2011. Prior to joining MSNBC as an anchor, Chris had previously served as a frequent substitute host for “The Rachel Maddow Show” and “The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell.” Chris became a MSNBC contributor in 2010 and has been with The Nation since 2007.

He is a former Fellow at Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics. From 2008-2010, he was a Bernard Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation. From 2005 to 2006, Chris was a Schumann Center Writing Fellow at In These Times.

Since 2002, Hayes has written on a wide variety of political and social issues, from union organizing and economic democracy, to the intersection of politics and technology. His essays, articles and reviews have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The Nation, The American Prospect, The New Republic, The Washington Monthly, the Guardian, and The Chicago Reader.

He is the author of two books, A Colony in a Nation (W.W. Norton & Company, 2017) and Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy (Crown Publishing Group, 2012)Chris grew up in the Bronx, graduated from Brown University in 2001 with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy.


  • March 10, 2008

    The Dark Side of the Moon

    Well, I don't have much to add to all the frenetic speculation and schaundenfraude following word that Eliot Spitzer has been linked to a prostitution ring. But the whole sordid mess reminded me of this Mark Twain quote:

    Every one is a moon, and has a dark side which he never shows anybody.

    Te-Ping and I were just discussing this, and wondering whether it's the case a)that success in electoral politics requires a degree of hubris and ego-mania that also leads high-profile politicians to transgress and believe they won't be caught or b) any random sampling of people subjected to the scrutiny of elected officials would yield a roughly similar amount of improprieties, and sins.

    Chris Hayes

  • March 10, 2008

    How Comcast Sees the World

    Sure, the 9/11 card gets pulled a lot. But really, this is ridiculous.

    Chris Hayes


  • March 10, 2008

    NSA’s Domestic Spying Arm Extends

    Today, the WSJ reports that NSA--once confined to foreign surveillance--has built a domestic surveillance program that can sift through individuals' phone records, email subject lines and destinations, financial transactions, Internet searches and sites visited. All without judicial warrants.

    It's like the Pentagon's Total Information Awareness program (eliminated in 2003 over concerns it was too intrusive), except with even less privacy protection.

    Chris Hayes

  • March 10, 2008

    Chart of the Day

    You've seen this before, but this a particularly adept visualization.

    Chris Hayes

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  • March 6, 2008

    Hiding in the Cayman Islands

    Here in the United States, overseas tax evasion enjoys a bizarre degree of acceptance, with some tax avoidance purveyors even going so far as to try and patent some of their fancier schemes. But today's Boston Globe report, which details how Kellogg Brown & Root--the nation's top Iraq War contractor (financed with $16 billion in public funds)--has neatly sidestepped some $500 million in Medicare and Social Security taxes through use of shell companies in the Cayman Islands, should hopefully raise some eyebrows.

    In the meantime, for more on KBR's pernicious backstory (involving bribe-taking, charging $45 per can of soda and receiving prostitutes as presents), check out last month's investigation from the Chicago Tribune. You can also read about the Levin-Coleman-Obama bill to curb overseas tax evasion here.

    Chris Hayes


  • March 6, 2008

    The NSA and Your Inbox

    As the Democrats prepare to fold on FISA, this week's comments from Assistant AG for National Security Kenneth Wainstein suggest that what the White House is really after isn't interception of foreign-to-foreign phone calls, but your email. From the Washington Post:

    Wainstein highlighted a different problem with the current FISA law than other administration officials have emphasized. Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell, for example, has repeatedly said FISA should be changed so no warrant is needed to tap a communication that took place entirely outside the United States but happened to pass through the United States....

    [But] Wainstein said FISA's current strictures did not cover strictly foreign wire and radio communications, even if acquired in the United States. The real concern, he said, is primarily e-mail, because "essentially you don't know where the recipient is going to be" and so you would not know in advance whether the communication is entirely outside the United States.

    Chris Hayes