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September 20, 2004 | The Nation

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September 20, 2004

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Paul Rogat Loeb shows why there's hope in a time of fear, Peter Dreier details growing poverty in the suburbs and Liza Featherstone asks whether Big Labor can come back.

Letters


SIZE DOESN'T MATTER...

Washington, DC

Editorials

OK, I tried to watch the Republican convention on TV--I really did--but the early rounds of the US Open were playing seductively on ESPN.

Labor Day has never been a very inspiring holiday, established as it was by late-nineteenth-century union bosses as a homegrown alternative to May Day, which was viewed as having uncomfortably le

Hidden in a Census Bureau report on poverty released in late August is a factoid with significant political and social consequences. Poverty has moved to the suburbs.

Being a gay or lesbian Republican isn't easy. Social conservatives condemn your "homosexual lifestyle," while your friends (and lovers) on the left see you as part of the antigay problem.

This article draws on reporting by Eyal Press, Esther Kaplan and Katha Pollitt.

More than a thousand days have passed since September 11, 2001, yet the wounds are still raw.

Columns

Good sizzle can always sell a lousy steak.

TIM RUSSERT: But, Senator, when you testified before the Senate, you talked about some of the hearings you had observed at the Winter Soldiers meeting, and you said that peop

When the "scrawny boy from Austria" delivered his peroration against faint-hearted "economic girlie men," it was an unusually seductive, even witty, appeal to a notion of free enterprise that is

We might provoke less violent demonstrations
If we invaded slightly fewer nations.

Articles

A bipartisan dialogue in this election year? In New York City? During the Republican convention?! We always knew those folks at The New School were a little nutty.

A once-sleepy population of artists and their fans has emerged as a loud and active proponent of political change.

This article was adapted from The Impossible Will Take a Little While: A Citizen's Guide to Hope in a Time of Fear (Basic Books, www.theimpossible.org).

Parts of this essay also appeared in You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train, in On History and on www.zmag.org.

This article was adapted from The Impossible Will Take a Little While: A Citizen's Guide to Hope in a Time of Fear (Basic Books, www.theimpossible.org).

This article was adapted from The Impossible Will Take a Little While: A Citizen's Guide to Hope in a Time of Fear (Basic Books, www.theimpossible.org).

Adapted from Everything We Love Can Be Saved, copyright 1997 by Alice Walker. Used by permission of Random House, Inc.

Part of this essay appeared in From the Ashes: A Spiritual Response to the Attack on America, by the editors of Beliefnet (Rodale).

Even in a seemingly lost cause, one person may unknowingly inspire another.

Sacred violence, again unleashed in 2001, could prove as destructive as in 1096.

Books & the Arts

Book

Perhaps you noticed them in the main square of your town this year--or last year, or any year you've been alive, in any town where you've ever lived: a group of people solemnly assembled, a pries

Poetry

At the border between the past and the future
No sign on a post warns that your passport
Won't let you return to your native land
As a citizen, just as a tourist

Book

Gertrude Himmelfarb is a remarkable woman. Remarkable, first, because in some respects she is a pioneer.

Book

It did not take long for a term that not long ago was slanderous to become a cliché.