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October 10, 2011 | The Nation

In the Magazine

October 10, 2011

Cover: Cover photo of the fortieth-anniversary commemoration of the March on Washington (2003) by Mannie Garcia/Reuters, cover design by Milton Glaser Incorporated

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Eric Foner on narratives of the Civil War, Gordon Lafer on change unions need and a poem by Bernard Nöel

Letters

Readers respond to the August 15/22 special issue on sports—only the second in the history of the magazine.

 

Editorials

There will not be justice for Troy Davis. But his case has reawakened Americans to a relic of injustice that must be abolished once and for all.

The NLRB has proposed a rule change that would make it much easier for workers to organize. No wonder the business lobby is up in arms.

Jake Blumgart on Atlantic City’s casino workers, and the Nation editors on The Nation’s Sidney Award

Who will save America from the grip of unions, sissies, humiliation, crisis and malaise? The Texas governor fancies he’s the cowboy for the job.

Columns

The former first lady speaks from beyond the grave—and shows how far we’ve come (and haven’t).

Electoral racism may be dead, but is there a more subtle form of racism at work in the white flight from Obama?

Articles

Van Jones of Green For All has joined MoveOn.org, the Campaign for America’s Future and dozens of other progressive organizations to challenge the reign of private interests.

In seeking to end direct election of senators, the governor is mainstreaming a far-right fantasy.

US regulators are turning a blind eye to the risks of offshore clinical trials.

Too many Americans have fallen prey to narratives that erase the role of slavery in the war’s origins and legacy.

Books & the Arts

Book

How the World Trade Center turned Manhattan into a planned community.

Art

The aesthetic illusions of a Korean artist.

Book

A biographer's flawed attempt to rediscover the politics in the decidedly political life of Malcolm X.