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Ari Melber | The Nation

Ari Melber

Author Bios

Ari Melber

Ari Melber

Ari Melber is The Nation's Net movement correspondent, covering politics, law, public policy and new media, and a regular contributor to the magazine's blog. He received a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and a J.D. from Cornell Law School, where he was an editor of the Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy.

Contact Ari: on Facebook, on Twitter, and at amelber@hotmail.com.

Melber is also an attorney, a columnist for Politico and a contributing editor at techPresident, a nonpartisan website covering technology’s impact on democracy. During the 2008 general election, he traveled with the Obama Campaign on special assignment for The Washington Independent.

He previously served as a Legislative Aide in the US Senate and as a national staff member of the 2004 John Kerry Presidential Campaign.

As a commentator on public affairs, Melber frequently speaks on national television and radio, including including appearances on NBC, CNBC, CNN, CNN Headline News, C-SPAN, MSNBC, Bloomberg News, FOX News, and NPR, on programs such as “The Today Show,” “American Morning,” “Washington Journal,” “Power Lunch,” "The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell," "The Joy Behar Show," “The Dylan Ratigan Show,” and “The Daily Rundown,” among others. Melber has also been a featured speaker at Harvard, Oxford, Yale, Columbia, NYU, The Center for American Progress and many other institutions. He has contributed chapters or essays to the books “America Now,” (St. Martins, 2009), “At Issue: Affirmative Action,” (Cengage, 2009), and “MoveOn’s 50 Ways to Love Your Country,” (Inner Ocean Publishing, 2004).  His reporting  has been cited by a wide range of news organizations, academic journals and nonfiction books, including the The Washington Post, The New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, CNN, FOX News, National Review Online, The New England Journal of Medicine and Boston University Law Review.  He is a member of the American Constitution Society, he serves on the advisory board of the Roosevelt Institute and lives in Manhattan.

 

Articles

News and Features

Social media companies say consumers’ loss of privacy is just the cost of doing business. But what would happen if they actually had to bargain with users on equal footing?

In his new book, Evgeny Morozov calls on the US government to reassess its technology sector, which is now yoked to the geopolitics of several pro-democracy uprisings.

Cartoon policy videos have not yet supplanted op-eds, but a recent breakout hit on the Federal Reserve is the kind of political content that could be highly influential in a mediascape increasingly driven by video and social sharing.

As Facebook continues to shape norms online and set the bar for aspiring start-ups, it is worth remembering the premise that it was built on.

Unlike during other periods of race-based strife in this country, this summer, there is no action. There is only media.

A new study finds that liberal blogs promote deeper participation than conservative blogs do--and are more vocal in asking readers to vote, donate and organize.

Ari Melber talks to web expert and Harvard law professor Yochai Benkler about the conservative and liberal blogospheres, the future of blog research and how Obama managed to run a fringe and a mainstream campaign at the same time.

Progressives are learning how Obama actually leads: as a manager and technocrat. And that's not a bad thing.

Former Obama adviser Marshall Ganz wonder why has it taken so long for Obama to settle on the most direct route to legislative victory on healthcare.

Organizing for America marks the first time a political party has deployed a permanent field program to advance a policy agenda between elections.

Blogs

Herman Cain leads the polls and the press, but an investigation of his campaign activities suggests he’s not really running for...
Georgetown is offering a class about the self-proclaimed ‘best rapper alive.’
A majority of senators officially back the president’s job bill, but Washington and the media are so broken, you’d never know...
One of Obama’s favorite novelists holds court on politics, the Wall Street protests and a new HBO adaptation of his famous work The...
The Nation live-blogs the Fox News-Google presidential debate.
Is the DC media really this confused about public opinion on taxing millionaires?
When Jon Stewart trades in his jokes for influence, is he picking fair fights?
 The most striking part of the first full-blown debate in the Republican primary was the total rejection of science.