Quantcast

Aram Roston | The Nation

Aram Roston

Author Bios

Aram Roston

Aram Roston is the winner of the 2010 Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding International Investigative Reporting. He is the author of The Man Who Pushed America to War: The Extraordinary Life, Adventures, and Obsessions of Ahmad Chalabi (Nation Books 2008). He's covered crime, corruption, conflicts, politics and national security for more than seventeen years. He has worked as a CNN correspondent, an NBC News investigative producer and a NY city police reporter, and he's written for The Nation, Playboy, GQ and other magazines and newspapers.

Articles

News and Features

The mayor's company created a “coalition” to promote its interests in the Comcast-NBC merger, proving itself an agile peddler of influence in Washington.

Pakistan's ISI served as an arbiter in the Taliban dispute over the New York Times reporter's kidnapping.

A GAO report suggests that Iraq is not broke. Instead, Iraq’s rulers have been sitting on a vast pile of cash while begging for billions of dollars from the US and the international community.

Why did American televangelist Pat Robertson make a mining deal with accused war criminal and deposed Liberian President Charles Taylor?

A Congressional investigation confirms what The Nation reported: US taxpayer funds are paying off Afghan warlords.

Security for key US military supply routes in Afghanistan is in the hands of a small group of powerful Afghan warlords who may be paying off the Taliban, finds a Congressional report being released Tuesday.

The effort to keep fuel flowing for the American military has led to questionable alliances in Kyrgyzstan and allegations of corruption entangling the US government.

 What is the secret to Ahmad Chalabi's success in Iraq? Some say it lies in his close family ties to the country's leading banks.

Has a major military contractor in Afghanistan created an Astroturf organization to promote long-term US engagement?

With Pentagon cash, contractors bribe insurgents not to attack supply lines for US troops