Republicans Who Are Defending Trump Now Are Setting Themselves Up to Lose the Senate in November

Republicans Who Are Defending Trump Now Are Setting Themselves Up to Lose the Senate in November

Joan Walsh on impeachment politics, Robert Lipsyte on the Super Bowl, and Morley Musick on the Border Patrol.

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Republican Senators in swing states are falling in their approval ratings back home. In Maine, Arizona, Colorado, and North Carolina, 63 percent of voters want the Senate to allow witnesses and subpoenas in the impeachment trial. Joan Walsh comments on the politics of impeachment, and on the losing arguments Trump’s attorneys have offered.

Plus: This Sunday is the Super Bowl, the biggest sports event in America—a hundred million people watch the Super Bowl these days. The Superbowl—and all of football—is sort of like Donald Trump: Both of them provide mass entertainment that promotes tribalism and toxic masculinity while keeping violence in vogue. Legendary sports writer Robert Lipsyte explains.

Also: the Border Patrol, it turns out, has a youth group—“Border Patrol Explorers,” an extension of the Boy Scouts. Morley Musick went to the Arizona border to find out who signs up and what they do once they’re in the organization.

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