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Vittoria De Sica's exploration of what an ordinary person must do to survive modern society is one of the landmark examples of neorealist cinema.

With William Wyler directing, Ben Hecht and John Huston writing and Laurence Olivier starring--could there have been any chance that it wouldn't be among the best movies ever made?

Love and frustration behind the cameras of a TV news set.

That's John Wayne, who used to speak with his fists and has to brandish them once again to win the girl of his dreams.

All it took were three mechanical sharks and a two-note tuba chorus. In the summer of 1975, the fish had the oceans to themselves.

Gillo Pontecorvo's realistic recreation of Algeria's struggle for independence against France remains one of the most influential political films ever made.

A film about juvenile delinquency left kids dancing in the aisles to devil's music--Bill Haley's "Rock Around the Clock"--and the rock 'n' roll generation was spawned.

Who doesn't love a hot tootsie-frootsie ice cream?

Ben Kingsley's channeled Mohandas Gandhi so deeply that it's difficult to view pictures of the sainted Indian leader without thinking of the actor.

Twenty-five years before Katy Perry, Jessica Lange kisses a girl and it feels good, even if it is Dustin Hoffman.

Blogs

A profile of Bell in The Nation that year reported that the Scot spoke with a "rattling burr that adds piquancy to whatever he says."

January 25, 2015

Not the Winston Churchill who once served on The Nation's editorial board.

January 24, 2015

Sheldon Silver and the history of “Legislative Corruption”.

January 23, 2015

The Nation had an old China hand, blacklisted in the McCarthy era, reflect on the American surrender in Vietnam.

January 23, 2015

After the Supreme Court legalized abortion on this day in 1973, The Nation published an editorial that seems curiously averse to discussion of the actual debate.

January 22, 2015

The Nation greeted the opening act of the Russian Revolution, in March 1917, with an enthusiasm bordering on glee. But how did it eulogize Lenin when seven years later, with actually existing communism already in place?

January 21, 2015

“A thin but pleasant sort of rhetoric” suffused FDR’s second inaugural address, The Nation thought.

January 20, 2015

Why does Europe so love Poe? The Nation’s Simeon Strunsky asked on the writer’s 100th birthday. Because in him “she has caught the true voice of the young world beyond the seas.”

January 19, 2015

The Nation’s editor reports from the conference, where he laments the absence of women, workers and communists.

January 18, 2015

When Dwight D. Eisenhower left office in January 1961 he warned against the growing menace to democracy of “the military-industrial complex,” to which The Nation devoted an entire issue in October of 1961 authored by Fred Cook, who more or less single-handedly revived the muckraking tradition in the United States.

January 17, 2015