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May 17, 1999 Issue

  • Features

    Starr and Willey: The Untold Story

    Amanda Elk, Rachel Margolis and David Schaenman provided research assistance. This article was supported in part by a Goldsmith Research Award from Harvard University's Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy and the Fund for Investigative Journalism in Washington, DC.

    Florence Graves and Jacqueline E. Sharkey

  • World Culture War

    In the past ten years, nationalist, communalist and religious fundamentalist social movements have surfaced all over the world, moving into the power vacuum created as local elites have been over

    Meredith Tax

  • Editorials

    Bradley’s Two Pauls

    One man is the symbol of Wall Street power. The other rose to prominence as a grassroots hellraiser. One believes in top-down control of the economy and celebrates global capitalism.

    David Corn

  • Starr Must Go

    Kenneth Starr, seeking to rehabilitate his reputation, is now portraying himself as a sincere professional trapped by the exigencies of a bad law.

    the Editors

  • The Guns of Littleton

    Dylan Klebold "is intelligent enough to make any dream a reality," a juvenile court counselor wrote last year.

    Bruce Shapiro

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  • Books and the Arts

    Global Indigestion

    I coined the term "global brunch" several years ago after seeing a film of the Stravinsky-Cocteau Oedipus Rex as staged by Julie Taymor.

    Stuart Klawans

  • Saddam the Phoenix

    Thanks principally to the reports of Barton Gellman in the Washington Post since last October, we know that US intelligence services fatally misused the United Nations Special Commission

    Dilip Hiro

  • Whistleblower’s Trill on Iraq

    Iraq is out of the news, mostly, except for the occasional report of a missile fired from a US jet flying over it on patrol. And Maj. Scott Ritter is off the air.

    William M. Arkin

  • Fading Czech Velvet

    As I'm driven to the home of Ivan Klima, one of the Czech Republic's most internationally respected writers, the hand of fate slips in beside me in the taxi.

    Mark Schapiro

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