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January 30, 2006 | The Nation

In the Magazine

January 30, 2006

Cover: Cover by Gene Case & Stephen Kling/Avenging Angels

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Mark Hertsgaard explores Green power in Germany, Alexander Cockburn reveals new details of FBI spying on Edward Said and Stuart Klawans reviews Michael Haneke’s Caché.

Letters

MCCAIN TORTURE BILL A BUST

Washington, DC

Editorials

Remembering Frank Wilkinson, American hero; full disclosure on Jack
Abramoff; Dave Letterman confronts Bill O'Reilly; a new baby for Nation contributing editors Liza Featherstone
and Doug Henwood.

Will Palestinians be compelled to live by Ariel Sharon's repressive vision or will they compel Israel to accept genuine self-determination for the
Palestinian people?

Suddenly, the Sharon era is over. And Sharon's centrist Kadima Party may emerge as the dominant force after the March 28 elections.

No voice rings as hollow as Newt Gingrich's on the GOP culture of
corruption. Incredibly, the media are swallowing his story.

Cleaning up Congress after the Abramoff scandal involves far more than
limits on gifts and perks. It requires barring the 'legalized bribery'
of major campaign contributions.

Columns

TruthDig

It's appalingly clear Team Bush is unwilling to do the hard work it takes to make Afghanistan the functioning nation it was before cold war games tore it apart.

Music

Women now outnumber men at colleges and universities, but higher
education has not become the fluffy pink playpen of feminism that some
conservatives envision.

The FBI was probably tapping Edward Said's phone right up until the day
he died. Details are emerging of a surveillance effort that extended
for nearly thirty years.

Testing a Congressman's memory of the former super-lobbyist: Good old
what's-his-name...but me? I hardly knew him.

Articles

Michelle Bachelet's election as Chile's first female president represents many things for her fellow citizens: the certainty of political continuity, the possibility of change and a commitment to the past.

We're on our way to being a society of economic zombies, half dead and half alive, buried in debt but prevented by credit card companies from declaring bankruptcy.

If the Alito confirmation hearings were a test of Democratic strategy, the Alito vote to come is a test of moderate Republican integrity and mettle.

Vaccine production in the United States is in an alarming condition--with drug-makers wedded to outmoded techniques and government more focused on terror than pandemics.

For a long time on Capitol Hill, no one was interested in lobbying reform. Now everybody wants to get in on the act.

A brutal raid on an encampment of refugees in Cairo has focused the world's attention on the netherworld Sudanese occupy in Egypt.

Samuel Alito and his handlers have crafted a disingenuous campaign that reeks of ethical compromise, bending Senate rules, bending the truth and compromising the confirmation process.

Samuel Alito's blunt testimony on international law revealed the extremity of his judicial philosophy and carried profound implications for rulings he might make.

While the edges continue to be smoothed off Martin Luther King Jr.'s bracing challenges to racism, war and free-market exploitation, the holiday is a time to remember a leader who believed civil rights and labor rights are tightly intertwined.

The Green Party fell from power in recent German elections, but Greens continue to be the party to watch, a progressive influence on the world's third-largest economy.

The Bush Administration's ill-advised new prescription drug program could destroy Medicare as a benefit for all Americans.

The time has come to call for the impeachment of President Bush. Any President who maintains he is above the law--and acts repeatedly on that belief--seriously endangers our consitutional system of government.

Books & the Arts

Film

Michael Haneke's Caché is a stylish thriller that scrapes away
at the surface of polite European affluence to lay bare the moral rot
beneath.

Book

Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism is a political
classic trapped in the era in which it was written.

Book

Kwame Anthony Appiah's Cosmopolitanism explores the middle ground between the universal laws of liberalism and relativism's blind respect for all
differences.