• Who is Hillary Clinton?

    Two Decades of Answers From the Left

    Introduction by Katha Pollitt


    Edited by Richard Kreitner

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    Who is Hillary Clinton? is a fascinating time-lapse depiction of the leading Democratic presidential candidate as seen from the left. But it is also much more than that. A carefully-edited anthology of The Nation’s coverage of Clinton’s career, it’s a rigorous and painstaking study of one our most enigmatic public figures. It is a history of our time, and a must-read for the 2016 election season.

    Contributors include David Corn, Erica Jong, Christopher Hitchens, Michael Tomasky, William Greider, Ari Berman, Barbara Ehrenreich, Chris Hayes, Jessica Valenti, Richard Kim, Joan Walsh, Jamelle Bouie, Doug Henwood, Heather Digby Parton, Michelle Goldberg, and many more.

    “Hillary Clinton is a Rorschach test of our attitudes—including our unconscious ones—about women, feminism, sex and marriage, to say nothing of the Democratic Party, progressive politics, the United States and capitalism,” writes Nation columnist Katha Pollitt in the book’s introduction. “This collection of Nation articles won’t answer all the readers’ questions, but at the very least in brings the Rorschach blot into clearer focus.”

    Electronic Version $9.99, Paperback version $14.99

  • Citizen Doctorow


    E.L. Doctorow

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    Notes on Art & Politics

    The Nation Essays 1978-2015

    Edited by
    RICHARD LINGEMAN

    Afterword by
    VICTOR NAVASKY

    The novelist E.L. Doctorow, who died in 2015, will long be remembered for his highly imaginative historical fiction. In intricate and profound works like Ragtime, Billy Bathgate, The March and many others, Doctorow helped redefine American fiction by subverting our received ideas about the past and offering a radical critique of contemporary culture.

    Yet Doctorow often saved his most daring and charged prose for his non-fiction, especially his numerous essays published over four decades in The Nation, a journal of which he was a longtime supporter. Collected here for the first time, Doctorow’s Nation essays show a brilliant writer probing through the detritus of American politics and culture for glimpses of intact American ideals. Often he finds them; sometimes, painfully, he does not.

    Whether paying homage to a literary ancestor, F. Scott Fitzgerald, or celebrating art as “a natural resource as critical to us and our identity and our survival as are our oil, our coal, our timber,” the essays collected in Citizen Doctorow are an unforgettable account of the American scene as understood by one of its most penetrating observers. Together, they offer a conclusive proof that, as Faulkner, one of Doctorow’s greatest influences, once put it, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.”

    Electronic version $9.99, Paperback version $14.99

  • The Nation: A Biography

    (The First 150 Years)

    D.D. Guttenplan

    Introduction by

    Eric Foner

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    The Nation: A Biography tells the surprising story behind America’s oldest weekly magazine, instigator of progress since 1865—the bickering abolitionists who founded it; the campaigns, causes and controversies that shaped it; the rebels, mavericks and visionaries who have written, edited and fought in its pages for 150 years and counting.

  • Inequality And One City

    Bill de Blasio and the New York Experiment, Year One

    Eric Alterman

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    Bill de Blasio’s election as mayor of New York captured the attention of a typically restless city. But it also made progressives across the country—and, indeed, around the world—sit up and take notice. With unprecedented popular support, de Blasio took office pledging to ìput an end to economic and social inequalities that threaten to unravel the city we love. Based on interviews with dozens of key figures in New York politics, including the mayor himself, Eric Alterman’s new e-book is a rigorous, fascinating and indispensable account of what happened next.

  • Some Truths Are Not Self-Evident

    Essays in The Nation on Civil Rights, Vietnam and "The War on Terror"

    Introduction by

    Frances Fox Piven

    Edited by

    Richard Kreitner

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    Millions of Americans have read and been galvanized by A People’s History of the United States. But many years before Howard Zinn published that epic saga of exploitation and resistance, he was organizing civil-rights protests and agitating for an end to the Vietnam War—and writing about those efforts in the pages of The Nation.

  • Molly Ivins

    Letters to The Nation

    Edited By

    Richard Lingeman

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    Writing in her native “Texlish,” Molly Ivins planted herself squarely in the tradition of plain-spoken and earthy American humor, the big river that runs from Mark Twain straight through to Will Rogers, Ring Lardner and George Carlin.

  • Gore Vidal’s State of the Union

    Nation Essays 1958-2005

    Edited by

    Richard Lingeman

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    Gore Vidal was the pre-eminent essayist of his generation—a writer known for his switchblade wit, elegant style, deep erudition and passionate devotion to progressive politics. The essays collected here all appeared in The Nation from 1958 to 2005 and cover a wide range of subjects—from politics and society to religion, manners and morals.

  • Smoking Gun

    The Nation on Watergate
    1952 – 2010

    Introduction by

    Elizabeth Holtzman

    Edited by

    Richard Kreitner

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    Four decades ago, Richard Nixon resigned as President of the United States when audiotapes confirmed what many had long suspected: a crook was living in the White House.

  • Surveillance Nation

    Critical Reflections on Privacy and Its Threats Articles from The Nation 1931-2014

    Introduction by

    David Cole

    Edited by

    Richard Kreitner

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    We’ve been living in 1984 since 1941. That was the year the Justice Department first authorized the wiretapping of Americans. “We shudder to think of what its agents will do with this new authorization,” The Nation warned in an editorial that year.

  • This Immigrant Nation

    Perspectives on an American Dilemma Articles from The Nation 1868-the Present

    Edited by

    Richard Lingeman

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    This unvarnished collection of articles traces evolving issues and provides a unique history of the long-running national immigration dilemma.

    American immigration has been debated in the pages of The Nation almost since its founding in 1865. The magazine has generally come down on the inclusive or “liberal” side of the great debate, but the editors were not immune from the prejudices of their times—an 1891 editorial called for the exclusion of “lunatics, paupers and cripples.”