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Christopher Hitchens | The Nation

Christopher Hitchens

Author Bios

Christopher Hitchens

Columnist

Christopher Hitchens, longtime contributor to The Nation, wrote a wide-ranging, biweekly column for the magazine from 1982 to 2002. With trademark savage wit, Hitchens flattens hypocrisy inside the Beltway and around the world, laying bare the "permanent government" of entrenched powers and interests.

Born in 1949 in Portsmouth, England, Hitchens received a degree in philosophy, politics and economics from Balliol College, Oxford, in 1970.

His books include Callaghan: The Road to Number Ten (Cassell, 1976); Hostage to History: Cyprus From the Ottomans to Kissinger (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1989); Imperial Spoils: The Case of the Parthenon Marbles (Hill and Wang, 1989); Blood, Class and Nostalgia: Anglo-American Ironies (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1990); and The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice (Verso, 1995); as well as two collections including many Nation essays: Prepared for the Worst (Hill and Wang, 1989) and For the Sake of Argument: Essays & Minority Reports (Verso, 1993). His most recent book is No One Left to Lie To: The Values of the Worst Family (Verso, 2000).

Hitchens has been Washington editor of Harper's and book critic for Newsday, and regularly contributes to such publications as Granta, The London Review of Books, Vogue, New Left Review, Dissent and the Times Literary Supplement.

Articles

News and Features

Nelson Algren's 1961 review of Catch-22 is at www.thenation.com.

Some things may be true even if Pat Buchanan says them, and the inescapable fact is that the 2000 presidential election has so far been a rigged affair, bearing more resemblance to a plebiscite i

Israeli schoolchildren returned to their desks this year to find a new history curriculum.

In rather the same way as new movies are now "reviewed" in terms of their first weekend gross, new candidates have become subject to evaluation by the dimensions of their "war chest." This silly,

It's always suspicious when Washingtonians start breaking into bad Latin. There may be a quid, you hear them say, and there seems to be a quo.

Tom Hayden's editorial essay ["The Liberals' Folly," May 24] was an offense to reason and an offense to principle. Why don't I begin with the principle?

Every now and then it really happens. A "military spokesman" emerges to prove that Joseph Heller was a realist, and Catch-22 a work of reportorial integrity.

In the very first days of Kosovo's drama of the dispossessed--a calculated atrocity that Slobodan Milosevic probably thinks of as his "exodus strategy"--the most amazing mantra began to be emitt

During the Balkan war of 1912, Leon Trotsky was a war correspondent for a group of liberal Russian and Ukrainian newspapers.

The best day's work that Lenin ever did was to publish the secret treaties that the Bolsheviks found in the archives of the czarist regime.