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New scholarship sheds light on Osama bin Laden's rhetoric, charisma and complex religious and political vision.

The Berkeley law professor's carte blanche constitutionalism was a gift
to the Bush Administration, offering legalistic justifications for
lawless behavior.

Performance artist Karen Finley answers questions about politics,
satire and her new book, a fantasy affair between George W. Bush and
Martha Stewart.

'Hello, Goodbye' is now just goodbye.

Jerome Charyn's Savage Shorthand: The Life and Death of Isaac
Babel
examines the life the revolutionary idealist murdered by
Stalin in 1940 and explodes the literary myths that have thus far
defined his works.

Rebecca Solnit's A Field Guide to Getting Lost plumbs the
mysteries of losing oneself and finding oneself in the realm of the
utter unknown.

By writing a novel about a conventional novelist writing about a
conventional man, J.M. Coetzee's latest work illuminates the role of
the novel and cuts through typical and tired theories on fiction.

The quiet purposefulness that characterized Rosa Parks's actions bears eloquent witness to the power of her protest.

Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men seems designed as a calculated assault on the reader.

Sean Wilsey's new memoir is a vulnerable, aching, unresolved account of growing up rich amid San Francisco's high society.

Blogs

“Swell packages aside, the ultimate thing about James Brown is the contradiction-healing groove,” a Nation critic once observed. “It’s like a brief return to paradise.”

May 3, 2015

"Hoover was not only the nation’s police chief; he filled a far more important post—he was its minister of internal security, an office of tremendous, if unacknowledged, power."

May 2, 2015

Each generation seems condemned to have to prove the obvious anew: slavery created the modern world, and the modern world’s divisions are the product of slavery.

May 1, 2015

“Hollywood will for a long time be in debt to Mr. Welles,” The Nation’s review predicted.

May 1, 2015

“It was once German and may be German again,” Thomas Mann wrote in The Nation, “to win respect and admiration by the human contribution, by the power of the sovereign spirit.”

April 30, 2015

“Rodney King is the symbol that links unleashed police racism in Los Angeles to the crisis of black life everywhere.”

April 29, 2015

“The decisive confrontation between the constitutionalists who want peace and the militarists who want war is close at hand.”

April 28, 2015

The Nation's critic in 1931 said the museum would abet the snobbery that believes "American painting is a second-rate affair."

April 27, 2015

"It was as if all South Africans, black, white and “coloreds” alike, were voting for the first time in their lives."

April 27, 2015