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The Berkeley law professor's carte blanche constitutionalism was a gift
to the Bush Administration, offering legalistic justifications for
lawless behavior.

Performance artist Karen Finley answers questions about politics,
satire and her new book, a fantasy affair between George W. Bush and
Martha Stewart.

'Hello, Goodbye' is now just goodbye.

Jerome Charyn's Savage Shorthand: The Life and Death of Isaac
Babel
examines the life the revolutionary idealist murdered by
Stalin in 1940 and explodes the literary myths that have thus far
defined his works.

Rebecca Solnit's A Field Guide to Getting Lost plumbs the
mysteries of losing oneself and finding oneself in the realm of the
utter unknown.

By writing a novel about a conventional novelist writing about a
conventional man, J.M. Coetzee's latest work illuminates the role of
the novel and cuts through typical and tired theories on fiction.

The quiet purposefulness that characterized Rosa Parks's actions bears eloquent witness to the power of her protest.

Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men seems designed as a calculated assault on the reader.

Sean Wilsey's new memoir is a vulnerable, aching, unresolved account of growing up rich amid San Francisco's high society.

Blogs

Not the Winston Churchill who once served on The Nation's editorial board.

January 24, 2015

Sheldon Silver and the history of “Legislative Corruption”.

January 23, 2015

The Nation had an old China hand, blacklisted in the McCarthy era, reflect on the American surrender in Vietnam.

January 23, 2015

After the Supreme Court legalized abortion on this day in 1973, The Nation published an editorial that seems curiously averse to discussion of the actual debate.

January 22, 2015

The Nation greeted the opening act of the Russian Revolution, in March 1917, with an enthusiasm bordering on glee. But how did it eulogize Lenin when seven years later, with actually existing communism already in place?

January 21, 2015

“A thin but pleasant sort of rhetoric” suffused FDR’s second inaugural address, The Nation thought.

January 20, 2015

Why does Europe so love Poe? The Nation’s Simeon Strunsky asked on the writer’s 100th birthday. Because in him “she has caught the true voice of the young world beyond the seas.”

January 19, 2015

The Nation’s editor reports from the conference, where he laments the absence of women, workers and communists.

January 18, 2015

When Dwight D. Eisenhower left office in January 1961 he warned against the growing menace to democracy of “the military-industrial complex,” to which The Nation devoted an entire issue in October of 1961 authored by Fred Cook, who more or less single-handedly revived the muckraking tradition in the United States.

January 17, 2015

The Nation’s editor and publisher Oswald Garrison Villard, whatever his radicalism on other issues, was a lifelong teetotaler, influenced by a childhood warning by his mother to stay away from strong drink. In an editorial titled “Who Undermines Prohibition?” (June 27, 1923). The Nation argued that the issue should be decided by a national popular vote.

January 16, 2015