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Monsanto is dangerously re-engineering America's food supply.

In a matter of hours, Mary Jo Kopechne lost her life and Ted Kennedy the presidency.

Fred Rodell is largely forgotten these days, but as the "bad boy of American legal academia" he inspired several generations of Yale Law School students to think differently about their chosen profession. Sidney Zion was one of them.

Sidney Zion celebrates the courage and independence of the late Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas

The maverick opinions of a a maverick reporter.

Roy Cohn was one of the most loathsome characters in American history, so why did he have so many influential friends?

Clarence Darrow may have embarrassed him at the Scopes trial, but William Jennings Bryan will long be remembered as one of the country's greatest progressive crusaders.

Jesse James may have been a robber and a thief, but at least he was a member in good standing of his church.

Yes, Virginia, this is an endorsement of Herbert Hoover
in The Nation.

What do Lindbergh Sr.'s leftist politics tell us about his son's character and courage?

Blogs

Yes, The Almanac covered the Clinton impeachment trial back on January 7. But the rules are the rules: seventeen years ago today, Bill Clinton looked America in the eyes and lied.

January 26, 2015

A profile of Bell in The Nation that year reported that the Scot spoke with a "rattling burr that adds piquancy to whatever he says."

January 25, 2015

Not the Winston Churchill who once served on The Nation's editorial board.

January 24, 2015

Sheldon Silver and the history of “Legislative Corruption”.

January 23, 2015

The Nation had an old China hand, blacklisted in the McCarthy era, reflect on the American surrender in Vietnam.

January 23, 2015

After the Supreme Court legalized abortion on this day in 1973, The Nation published an editorial that seems curiously averse to discussion of the actual debate.

January 22, 2015

The Nation greeted the opening act of the Russian Revolution, in March 1917, with an enthusiasm bordering on glee. But how did it eulogize Lenin when seven years later, with actually existing communism already in place?

January 21, 2015

“A thin but pleasant sort of rhetoric” suffused FDR’s second inaugural address, The Nation thought.

January 20, 2015

Why does Europe so love Poe? The Nation’s Simeon Strunsky asked on the writer’s 100th birthday. Because in him “she has caught the true voice of the young world beyond the seas.”

January 19, 2015

The Nation’s editor reports from the conference, where he laments the absence of women, workers and communists.

January 18, 2015