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William Greider | The Nation

William Greider

Author Bios

William Greider

William Greider

National Affairs Correspondent

William Greider, a prominent political journalist and author, has been a reporter for more than 35 years for newspapers, magazines and television. Over the past two decades, he has persistently challenged mainstream thinking on economics.

For 17 years Greider was the National Affairs Editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where his investigation of the defense establishment began. He is a former assistant managing editor at the Washington Post, where he worked for fifteen years as a national correspondent, editor and columnist. While at the Post, he broke the story of how David Stockman, Ronald Reagan's budget director, grew disillusioned with supply-side economics and the budget deficits that policy caused, which still burden the American economy.

He is the author of the national bestsellers One World, Ready or Not, Secrets of the Temple and Who Will Tell The People. In the award-winning Secrets of the Temple, he offered a critique of the Federal Reserve system. Greider has also served as a correspondent for six Frontline documentaries on PBS, including "Return to Beirut," which won an Emmy in 1985.

Greider's most recent book is The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to A Moral Economy. In it, he untangles the systemic mysteries of American capitalism, details its destructive collisions with society and demonstrates how people can achieve decisive influence to reform the system's structure and operating values.

Raised in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, he graduated from Princeton University in 1958. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

Articles

News and Features

The first step toward lasting financial reform is to identify the roots of the crisis.

While the mainstream press portrays newly reappointed Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke as a mild-mannered hero, the reality is he is responsible for much of the economic pain Americans are feeling.

After a brilliant beginning, President Obama appears to be abandoning his principles on healthcare by hedging on a public option. What should disappointed Democrats do?

Did Obama sell out? If House Democrats don't insist on the government's prerogative to bargain for lower prices, reform is impossible.

In naming Phil Angelides as chair of the new Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, Congress has picked an aggressive, visionary reformer.

How to fix the Federal Reserve.

Congress should step up its investigations of the roots of the financial crisis and slow down the rush to weak solutions--especially the empowerment of the Federal Reserve.

What's missing in the President's call for reform are concrete rules that address a dysfunctional banking system. Slow down the rush to weak solutions.

Taxing benefits may raise money for Obama's healthcare reform, but it would betray union members who gave up wage increases in order to get decent coverage.


Greider: An American Dream

Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif.

Blogs

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