Quantcast

William Greider | The Nation

William Greider

Author Bios

William Greider

William Greider

National Affairs Correspondent

William Greider, a prominent political journalist and author, has been a reporter for more than 35 years for newspapers, magazines and television. Over the past two decades, he has persistently challenged mainstream thinking on economics.

For 17 years Greider was the National Affairs Editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where his investigation of the defense establishment began. He is a former assistant managing editor at the Washington Post, where he worked for fifteen years as a national correspondent, editor and columnist. While at the Post, he broke the story of how David Stockman, Ronald Reagan's budget director, grew disillusioned with supply-side economics and the budget deficits that policy caused, which still burden the American economy.

He is the author of the national bestsellers One World, Ready or Not, Secrets of the Temple and Who Will Tell The People. In the award-winning Secrets of the Temple, he offered a critique of the Federal Reserve system. Greider has also served as a correspondent for six Frontline documentaries on PBS, including "Return to Beirut," which won an Emmy in 1985.

Greider's most recent book is The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to A Moral Economy. In it, he untangles the systemic mysteries of American capitalism, details its destructive collisions with society and demonstrates how people can achieve decisive influence to reform the system's structure and operating values.

Raised in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, he graduated from Princeton University in 1958. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

Articles

News and Features

Take a dollar from working stiffs who need government, take a dollar from the super-rich who don’t need a tax break. How fair is that?

Law enforcement agencies have not undertaken a thorough investigation of the banking crisis. But Eric Schneiderman is digging into it.

True economic recovery will require creative solutions to deeply rooted problems. Our first great task is to change the way we talk about what's possible.

Warren's biggest problem isn't the Republicans. It's Obama's finance boys who don't want an outspoken consumer advocate in a powerful role.

It is impossible to believe the government of Pakistan did not know exactly where we could find Osama.

Now that Osama is dead, can America at last break free of the conceit of endless war? 

If Obama continues to refuse to intervene in the economy, Americans are in for a painful decade.

"Brave" politicians in both parties want to cut healthcare and Social Security to save the country from wrathful judgment by Standard & Poor’s. What a hoot.

In the foreclosure scandal, the crooks are still calling the shots.

Over the past decade, the Justice Department has gone soft on corporate crime.

Blogs

The CIA and NSA routinely ignore the Constitution, yet want the Justice Department to protect them from an over-reaching Congress.
Volcker, Greenspan and Bernanke created this messed up economy, and now it's up to Janet Yellen to clean up after them.
Thanks to Chief Justice John Roberts, millions of poor Americans won’t get health insurance. 
Monetary policy is a feminist issue—and Janet Yellen has an opportunity to change some of the Fed’s basic values.
Will the amendment be enough to change the behavior of bankers? Doubtful.
Two cheers for Bill Gross, the co-founder and managing director of PIMCO, the California-based bond house that manages some $2 trillion in...
It sounds far-fetched, but the US has a history of high-level snooping.
Will the Justice Department finally pursue criminal charges against the megabank for its long list of misdeeds?