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William Greider | The Nation

William Greider

Author Bios

William Greider

William Greider

National Affairs Correspondent

William Greider, a prominent political journalist and author, has been a reporter for more than 35 years for newspapers, magazines and television. Over the past two decades, he has persistently challenged mainstream thinking on economics.

For 17 years Greider was the National Affairs Editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where his investigation of the defense establishment began. He is a former assistant managing editor at the Washington Post, where he worked for fifteen years as a national correspondent, editor and columnist. While at the Post, he broke the story of how David Stockman, Ronald Reagan's budget director, grew disillusioned with supply-side economics and the budget deficits that policy caused, which still burden the American economy.

He is the author of the national bestsellers One World, Ready or Not, Secrets of the Temple and Who Will Tell The People. In the award-winning Secrets of the Temple, he offered a critique of the Federal Reserve system. Greider has also served as a correspondent for six Frontline documentaries on PBS, including "Return to Beirut," which won an Emmy in 1985.

Greider's most recent book is The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to A Moral Economy. In it, he untangles the systemic mysteries of American capitalism, details its destructive collisions with society and demonstrates how people can achieve decisive influence to reform the system's structure and operating values.

Raised in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, he graduated from Princeton University in 1958. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

Articles

News and Features

In many ways, Senator John Kerry is the perfect candidate for the Democratic Party--handsome and serious, well regarded if not widely loved, deeply experienced in governing policy and sincerely c

Lay's belated indictment reminds one of the limp response of Washington politics.

The most intriguing story in Washington these days is a subterranean conflict that reporters cannot cover because some of them are involved.

The Gipper had a certain goofiness about him that was impossible not to like. He told "war stories" borrowed from old movies with such sincerity you were sure he must have been there.

The quest for homeland security is heading, in ad hoc fashion, toward the quasi militarization of everyday life.

A political slogan is not a strategy for national defense.

Alan Greenspan is well loved among the governing elites and seldom criticized, because he convincingly plays the role of America's Dr. Pangloss.

It is a
pity the major news media have not convened a commission of inquiry
to examine their own mistakes and derelictions concerning the war in
Iraq.

John Kerry is borne aloft by party unity and the overriding imperative of defeating Bush, but the senator has entered a perilous zone where the outcome may depend more on the content of his chara

Blogs

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Americans want to believe that sports are the last remaining venue for honest competition—but we’ve known otherwise for years.
Different values might have prevailed if it had been Lehman Sisters rather than Lehman Brothers.
Forty years later, we still haven’t confronted the true lesson of Vietnam.
Doug Hughes is not a dangerous fruitcake. In fact, he is a small-d democratic idealist who went out of his way to alert the authorities in...
The thought leaders of the Next System Project want to move past the narrow debate about policy and toward a conversation about the deeper...
After five decades of pretending otherwise, the Pentagon has reluctantly confirmed that Israel does indeed possess nuclear bombs, as well...
Israel’s nuclear superiority is a pivotal factor in the chaotic conflicts and occasional wars of the Middle East—it shouldn...