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William Greider | The Nation

William Greider

Author Bios

William Greider

William Greider

National Affairs Correspondent

William Greider, a prominent political journalist and author, has been a reporter for more than 35 years for newspapers, magazines and television. Over the past two decades, he has persistently challenged mainstream thinking on economics.

For 17 years Greider was the National Affairs Editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where his investigation of the defense establishment began. He is a former assistant managing editor at the Washington Post, where he worked for fifteen years as a national correspondent, editor and columnist. While at the Post, he broke the story of how David Stockman, Ronald Reagan's budget director, grew disillusioned with supply-side economics and the budget deficits that policy caused, which still burden the American economy.

He is the author of the national bestsellers One World, Ready or Not, Secrets of the Temple and Who Will Tell The People. In the award-winning Secrets of the Temple, he offered a critique of the Federal Reserve system. Greider has also served as a correspondent for six Frontline documentaries on PBS, including "Return to Beirut," which won an Emmy in 1985.

Greider's most recent book is The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to A Moral Economy. In it, he untangles the systemic mysteries of American capitalism, details its destructive collisions with society and demonstrates how people can achieve decisive influence to reform the system's structure and operating values.

Raised in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, he graduated from Princeton University in 1958. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

Articles

News and Features


PEOPLE POWER IN OHIO & THE NATION

Cleveland

Professor Paul Samuelson's Economics: An Introductory Analysis has been the bestselling college economics textbook for more than fifty years.

Apocalyptic language intensifies, but the election may be less definitive than many think.

A talk with David Cobb, the Green Party's presidential candidate.

The presidential pageant has now risen full in the sky and is blocking out the sun.

OK, I tried to watch the Republican convention on TV--I really did--but the early rounds of the US Open were playing seductively on ESPN.

George W. Bush is damaged goods, but he has found his campaign voice--the forked tongue of the high road/low road politician.

Not to risk blasphemy, but shouldn't a special commission look into whether God provided the warrior President with faulty intelligence? Recall that George W.

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