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William Greider | The Nation

William Greider

Author Bios

William Greider

William Greider

National Affairs Correspondent

William Greider, a prominent political journalist and author, has been a reporter for more than 35 years for newspapers, magazines and television. Over the past two decades, he has persistently challenged mainstream thinking on economics.

For 17 years Greider was the National Affairs Editor at Rolling Stone magazine, where his investigation of the defense establishment began. He is a former assistant managing editor at the Washington Post, where he worked for fifteen years as a national correspondent, editor and columnist. While at the Post, he broke the story of how David Stockman, Ronald Reagan's budget director, grew disillusioned with supply-side economics and the budget deficits that policy caused, which still burden the American economy.

He is the author of the national bestsellers One World, Ready or Not, Secrets of the Temple and Who Will Tell The People. In the award-winning Secrets of the Temple, he offered a critique of the Federal Reserve system. Greider has also served as a correspondent for six Frontline documentaries on PBS, including "Return to Beirut," which won an Emmy in 1985.

Greider's most recent book is The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to A Moral Economy. In it, he untangles the systemic mysteries of American capitalism, details its destructive collisions with society and demonstrates how people can achieve decisive influence to reform the system's structure and operating values.

Raised in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, he graduated from Princeton University in 1958. He currently lives in Washington, DC.

Articles

News and Features

The bailout crisis represents the Democrats' hesitant first step toward rediscovering their nerve and abandoned convictions. They are not there yet.

The road to recovery requires more than a bailout. Americans deserve apologies from Washington and Wall Street--and a new president capable of telling the truth and leading us forward.

Something needs to be done for the American taxpayer--something fair--to salvage Wall Street. We want the same deal Warren Buffet got.

Rescuing America from irresponsible Wall Street is worth at least what it costs to save the bloodied bankers.

Instead of handing Bernanke $700 billion with no strings attached, government should take over the banking and finance sector, clean it up and start funneling money into the real economy.

Paulson's rescue plan represents a historic swindle--all sugar for the villains, lasting pain for the rest of us. Don't let Wall Street get away with this without enacting significant reform.

The house of global finance is on fire--and the lightning bailout of AIG raises serious question about government's capacity to extinguish the flames.

An epic deflation of wealth sweeps away arrogant financiers and their fraudulent gimmicks, settin the stage for reform.

We are flirting with catastrophe, and our foreign creditors are part of the story.

Nobody knows if the current financial crisis could become the type of economic unraveling that makes history.

Blogs

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