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Victor Navasky | The Nation

Victor Navasky

Author Bios

Victor Navasky

Publisher Emeritus

Victor Navasky, publisher emeritus of The Nation, was the magazine's editor from 1978 to 1995 and publisher and editorial director from 1995 to 2005. In 1994, while on a year's leave of absence, he served first as a fellow at the Institute of Politics at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and then as a senior fellow at the Freedom Forum Media Studies Center at Columbia University.

Before coming to The Nation he was an editor at The New York Times Magazine and wrote a monthly column about the publishing business ("In Cold Print") for the New York Times Book Review. He is the author of Kennedy Justice (Atheneum, 1977), the American Book Award winner Naming Names and, most recently, A Matter of Opinion. He is co-author with Christopher Cerf of The Experts Speak: The Definitive Compendium of Authoritative Misinformation, now in its second edition.

Navasky has also served as a Guggenheim Fellow, a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and Ferris Visiting Professor of Journalism at Princeton. He has taught at a number of colleges and universities and has contributed articles and reviews to numerous magazines and journals of opinion. He is a graduate of Yale Law School (1959) and Swarthmore College (1954), where he was Phi Beta Kappa with high honors in the social sciences.

In addition to his Nation responsibilities, Navasky is also director of the George Delacorte Delacorte Center for Magazine Journalism at Columbia University and a regular commentator on the public radio program Marketplace.

Mr. Navasky, who has three children, lives in New York City with his wife, Anne. He serves on the boards of the Authors Guild, PEN and the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Articles

News and Features

As Editor Katrina vanden Heuvel becomes the latest in a long
line of publisher/owners of The Nation, Victor Navasky looks
ahead to his new role as publisher emeritus and member of the
magazine's editorial board.

On both sides of the Atlantic, liberal news magazines facing declining
circulation have started to play into the celebrity culture. But there
are gems that have the power to carry our culture through its Las
Vegas-ization.

What's necessary to protect reporters' sources and the public's need to know?

Speculation about Deep Throat is a distraction from the threat of illegal government surveillance.

Thoughts on the critical role of the journal of dissent in America.

When it comes to presidential politics there seem to be a half-dozen narratives favored by big (and small-minded) media: Who's ahead?, "Gotcha!", the (cynical) assumption that all policy pronounc

Everyone agrees. The story is that there is no story. The candidates have already been chosen. The platform has been written to avoid controversy.


LITTLE RED SCHOOLHOUSE RED?

Washington, DC

I did a double take when I got to the eighth paragraph of the
Washington Post's eleven-paragraph August 21 news story on Kathy
Boudin's parole.

Sidney Hook, the Marxist philosopher-turned-neoconservative who once
mistakenly listed I.F.