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Patricia J. Williams | The Nation

Patricia J. Williams

Author Bios

Patricia J. Williams

Patricia J. Williams

Columnist

Patricia J. Williams, a professor of law at Columbia University, was born in Boston in 1951 and holds a BA from Wellesley College and a JD from Harvard Law School.

She was a fellow in the School of Criticism and Theory at Dartmouth College and has been an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin School Law School and its department of women's studies. Williams also worked as a consumer advocate in the office of the City Attorney in Los Angeles.

A member of the State Bar of California and the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit. Williams has served on the advisory council for the Medgar Evers Center for Law and Social Justice of the City University of New York and on the board of governors for the Society of American Law Teachers, among others.

Her publications include Anthony Burns: The Defeat and Triumph of a Fugitive Slave, On Being the Object of Property, The Electronic Transformation of Law and And We Are Not Married: A Journal of Musings on Legal Language and the Ideology of Style. In 1993, Harvard University Press published Williams's The Alchemy of Race & Rights to widespread critical acclaim. She is also author of The Rooster's Egg (Harvard, 1995), Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race (Reith Lectures, 1997) (Noonday Press, 1998) and, most recently, Open House: On Family Food, Friends, Piano Lessons and The Search for a Room of My Own (Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2004.)

Articles

News and Features

The Supreme Court has ruled that the Westboro Baptist Church can't be punished for picketing at funerals. Is this really a win for free speech?

The real dilemma in Amy Chua's book is how to survive in a world in which the slightest nonconformity risks landing you out of a job, a home, a life.

Adoption has become a form of trafficking in and of itself.

The Rally for Sanity gathered Americans who equate political sanity with studiousness and curiosity.

When revelations of unethical medical experimentation by the US in Guatemala surfaced, there were, as always, protestations of "never again." But we're failing to address the true cost of the experiment: distrust of the medical establishment among the disenfranchised.

When we willingly donate parts of our bodies to science, who should profit?

Have we learned the right lessons from the mistreatment of Shirley Sherrod?

Sure, some Americans use their flag in poor taste.  But should they be prevented from doing so?

We're not anxious about whether Elena Kagan is gay. We're anxious about whether she's masculine.

Blogs

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