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Patricia J. Williams | The Nation

Patricia J. Williams

Author Bios

Patricia J. Williams

Patricia J. Williams

Columnist

Patricia J. Williams, a professor of law at Columbia University, was born in Boston in 1951 and holds a BA from Wellesley College and a JD from Harvard Law School.

She was a fellow in the School of Criticism and Theory at Dartmouth College and has been an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin School Law School and its department of women's studies. Williams also worked as a consumer advocate in the office of the City Attorney in Los Angeles.

A member of the State Bar of California and the Federal Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit. Williams has served on the advisory council for the Medgar Evers Center for Law and Social Justice of the City University of New York and on the board of governors for the Society of American Law Teachers, among others.

Her publications include Anthony Burns: The Defeat and Triumph of a Fugitive Slave, On Being the Object of Property, The Electronic Transformation of Law and And We Are Not Married: A Journal of Musings on Legal Language and the Ideology of Style. In 1993, Harvard University Press published Williams's The Alchemy of Race & Rights to widespread critical acclaim. She is also author of The Rooster's Egg (Harvard, 1995), Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race (Reith Lectures, 1997) (Noonday Press, 1998) and, most recently, Open House: On Family Food, Friends, Piano Lessons and The Search for a Room of My Own (Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2004.)

Articles

News and Features

It really is extraordinary. Bechtel is awarded the biggest reconstruction contract in Iraq without having to compete for it.

"They got whacked and won't try that again," said an unnamed Pentagon official in the wake of the recent deadly confrontation in the Iraqi town of Samarra.

"Iwouldn't ask him to escort my daughter to her senior prom," explained
one of the jurors who in mid-November acquitted Robert Durst of
murdering his quarrelsome neighbor, Morris Black.

He's an intriguing moral bellwether, Nathaniel Heatwole.

Philip Roth's novel The Human Stain attracted considerable
attention some years back; it was widely read as a fictionalized version
of literary critic Anatole Broyard's life.

We live in interesting times. These days we can all pretty much
acknowledge that race does not exist as a scientific construct; these
days, we can all agree that racism is wrong.

I was a child who, when taken to the circus, spent all her time trying to see past the greasepaint and illusion.

With street fighting prevailing, Paul Bremer, the American administrator
in Iraq, recently trotted out a new "two-sided approach," according to
the New York Times.

A recent article in the Washington Post described some suburban
high schoolers preparing for their proms by spending nearly $3,000 to
rent an H2 Hummerzine, "complete with six TVs, a DVD

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