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Mark Hertsgaard | The Nation

Mark Hertsgaard

Author Bios

Mark Hertsgaard

Environment Correspondent

Mark Hertsgaard, The Nation’s environment correspondent, is an independent journalist and the author of six books that have been translated into sixteen languages, including HOT:  Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth.

Articles

News and Features

It's time to take on those who are sabotaging our response to the climate crisis—face to face.

Five years after Hurricane Katrina, a holiday of remembrance and rebirth on the streets of New Orleans's hardest-hit neighborhood.

The agreements reached at the Cancún climate summit oblige all nations to reduce future emissions. The challenge now is to generate the political pressure on national leaders to accept realistic targets.

The agreements reached at last week's climate summit oblige all nations to reduce future emissions. The challenge now is to generate the political pressure to compel national leaders to accept realistic targets.

On October 10, more than 7,000 actions in 180 countries will celebrate solutions to climate change in what is expected to be the greatest number of recorded protests in a single day in world history.

Louisiana can't go cold turkey: it can only wean itself off oil through an orderly transition.

Let the Bhopal case settlement be a horrifying reminder: it is a constant temptation for profit-maximizing corporations to cut corners on safety.

Ken Salazar is one of the strongest advocates of offshore drilling in Washington. Will his Interior Department really enforce the moratorium on new drilling permits?

Activists are figuring out what went wrong at the climate summit and what to do next.

Blogs

President Obama and Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao will meet within hours in Copenhagen to try to break the deadlock.
The Alliance of Small Island Nations roils summit with call for huge emissions reductions as activists prepare for global day of action...
How Obama could save or scuttle a deal in Copenhagen, and why he needs civil society to push him.