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Liza Featherstone | The Nation

Liza Featherstone

Author Bios

Liza Featherstone

Contributing Editor

Liza Featherstone is a journalist based in New York City. Her work on student and youth activism has been published in The Nation, Lingua Franca, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, Left Business Observer, Dissent, The Sydney Morning Herald and Columbia Journalism Review. Featherstone has also written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, Newsday, In These Times, Ms., Salon, Nerve, US, Nylon and Rolling Stone. She is the co-author of Students Against Sweatshops: The Making of a Movement (Verso, 2002) and author of Selling Women Short: The Landmark Battle for Worker's Rights at Wal-Mart (Basic, 2004).

Articles

News and Features

Venezuela's controversial program to provide heating oil to impoverished
American communities exposes the inability of the richest nation on
earth to meet the needs of its poor.

Thanks to a thoughtful grassroots campaign, voters in South Dakota rejected a draconian abortion ban.

The electoral process worked for pro-choice advocates in South Dakota,
overturning an abortion ban with a grassroots appeal to keep the government out of citizens' personal lives.

Wal-Mart is serious about bringing organic food to the masses, but
transportation costs and the retail giant's aggressive competitive ways
could end up hurting small farms and the environment.

A hard-hitting documentary, an embarrassing leaked memo on healthcare
and abandonment by customers who don't like its politics. It's
getting harder these days for Wal-Mart to put on a happy public face.

As the nation's wealthiest family, the Waltons could be
a force for social good. But when they choose to spend their fortune
lobbying for pet projects, tax cuts and charter schools instead of
providing a living wage for their workers, they are dangerous (and
costly) to the nation.

Last week's antiwar rally in Washington sent a
single, unequivocal message: At home and abroad, the Bush
Administration is a complete failure.

New Orleans was top-of-mind for more than 100,000
peace advocates in Washington who delivered a clear and unified
message, protesting the Bush Administration's war in Iraq and its
callous indifference to the victims of the Gulf Coast hurricanes.

For once, Wal-Mart is acting like a hero, with speedy
delivery of water and supplies to Hurricane Katrina victims. If it
could only act that way every day.

Sounds like an episode of The Simpsons, but this
is for real: The retail giant wants even more of your money.

Blogs

Last week your humble correspondent learned, over a dry repast of catered chicken with some of our nation's most influential men, that...
So much City Council legislation -- whether in New York or other cities -- is essentially performance art, even if its intentions are...
Today I had lunch with Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott, SEIU president Andy Stern, and the disembodied head of Arnold Schwarzenegger. Let me explain.
I'm amused that none of my Notion colleagues have commented on the Washington, D.C. sex scandal. Time to break this high-minded code of...