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Katha Pollitt | The Nation

Katha Pollitt

Author Bios

Katha Pollitt

Katha Pollitt

Columnist

Katha Pollitt is well known for her wit and her keen sense of both the ridiculous and the sublime. Her "Subject to Debate" column, which debuted in 1995 and which the Washington Post called "the best place to go for original thinking on the left," appears every other week in The Nation; it is frequently reprinted in newspapers across the country. In 2003, "Subject to Debate" won the National Magazine Award for Columns and Commentary. She is also a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute.

Pollitt has been contributing to The Nation since 1980. Her 1992 essay on the culture wars, "Why We Read: Canon to the Right of Me..." won the National Magazine Award for essays and criticism, and she won a Whiting Foundation Writing Award the same year. In 1993 her essay "Why Do We Romanticize the Fetus?" won the Maggie Award from the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

Many of Pollitt's contributions to The Nation are compiled in three books: Reasonable Creatures: Essays on Women and Feminism (Knopf); Subject to Debate: Sense and Dissents on Women, Politics, and Culture (Modern Library); and Virginity or Death! And Other Social and Political Issues of Our Time (Random House). In 2007 Random House published her collection of personal essays, Learning to Drive and Other Life Stories. Two pieces from this book, "Learning to Drive" and its followup, "Webstalker," originally appeared in The New Yorker. "Learning to Drive" is anthologized in Best American Essays 2003.

Pollitt has also written essays and book reviews for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Harper's, Ms., Glamour, Mother Jones, the New York Times, and the London Review of Books. She has appeared on NPR's Fresh Air and All Things Considered, Charlie Rose, The McLaughlin Group, CNN, Dateline NBC and the BBC. Her work has been republished in many anthologies and is taught in many university classes.

For her poetry, Pollitt has received a National Endowment for the Arts grant and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her 1982 book Antarctic Traveller won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her poems have been published in many magazines and are reprinted in many anthologies, most recently The Oxford Book of American Poetry (2006).  Her second collection, The Mind-Body Problem, came out from Random House in 2009.

Born in New York City, she was educated at Harvard and the Columbia School of the Arts. She has lectured at dozens of colleges and universities, including Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brooklyn College, UCLA, the University of Mississippi and Cornell. She has taught poetry at Princeton, Barnard and the 92nd Street Y, and women's studies at the New School University.

Articles

News and Features

Esta es una economía en las sombras: el 89 ´por ciento de las niñeras ni siquiera cobra salario mínimo.

Tip-stealing bosses are rarely called to account for their abuses. It's time to blow the whistle.

Child-rearing fads aren’t really about children. They’re about regulating the behavior of women.

Why is it so hard to understand that women's rights are an economic issue?

The brouhaha over Hilary Rosen’s comments was not really about whether what stay-home mothers do is work.

Katniss Everdeen is a new kind of pop heroine. No boy-crazy shopaholic, she's a complex character on a quest of her own.

Here’s why you should make a major gift to an abortion fund.

Bad things happen when laws to protect fetuses are turned against the women who carry them.

The great Polish poet disclaimed grand political schemes in favor of irony, wit, skepticism and the individual.

Blogs

The real credibility problems in the Dominique Strauss-Kahn case shouldn’t make us forget how many women lose out in a justice system...
A shaky trend story gets it very wrong about young women and sex.
Planned Parenthood gets no federal money to provide abortion care. So why does the media keep claiming the looming government shutdown is...
The fact that Susan Rice, Samantha Power and Hillary Clinton skillfully argued for military intervention in Libya and won their point is...
New York State Supreme Court Justice Emily Jane Goodman's rulings regularly raise hackles, but now Mayor Bloomberg is getting in on the act.
Watch out for people who want to make life harder for real-life women on the grounds that it’ll help "women."
I'd like to get away with a crime, too. How great a writer do I have to be to have the Swiss government protect me?