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Jeremy Brecher | The Nation

Jeremy Brecher

Author Bios

Jeremy Brecher

Jeremy Brecher’s new book Save the Humans? Common Preservation in Action, just published by Paradigm Publishers, addresses how social movements make social change. Brecher is the author of more than a dozen books on labor and social movements, including Strike! and Global Village or Global Pillage and the winner of five regional Emmy awards for his documentary movie work. He currently works with the Labor Network for Sustainability.

Articles

News and Features

2006 will be remembered as a year in which the American people and the world rose up to challenge the criminal actions and deceit of the Bush Administration.

A mainstream media legal analyst dismissed efforts to prosecute Donald
Rumsfeld and others for war crimes as ridiculous. They're not.

Human rights advocates are pressing German courts to prosecute Donald
Rumsfeld, Alberto Gonzales and other Bush Administration officials for
war crimes. They just might succeed.

The 109th Congress, led by Republican
Senators McCain, Warner, and Graham and with the acquiescence of many
Democrats, is poised to legalize torture, trials with secret evidence,
and annulment of the right of habeas corpus

The standoff between the Senate and the Bush Administration over
military tribunals, torture and war crimes tests core legal and moral
issues and will determine the kind of country America wishes to be.

Bolstered by a Supreme Court ruling that rebuked the Bush
Administration's excessive exercise of power, Lieut. Ehren Watada's
pending court-martial could help restore the rule of law and
energize a popular movement to end an illegal war.

Growing concern over Bush's abuses of executive power could be the force that unites Democrats, Republicans and libertarians in a broad, nonpartisan effort to defend the Constitution and the rule of law.

Congress and the American people must challenge the
Administration's assertion that the President can take military action
without consulting Congress.

When the day comes for America to be judged for its war on terror and
the human rights crimes that have been done in the name of its
citizens, who can say they stood up and said no?

In the wake of Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on warrantless spying, bipartisan efforts to rein in the Bush Administration's exercise of executive power are gaining momentum.