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Greg Kaufmann | The Nation

Greg Kaufmann

Author Bios

Greg Kaufmann

Greg Kaufmann is the former poverty correspondent to The Nation and a current contributor. He serves as an advisor to the Ehrenreich Hardship Reporting Project and the Half in Ten Campaign. Through his writing he seeks to increase media coverage of poverty, share new research, elevate the voices of people living in poverty and offer readers opportunities to get involved with organizations working to eradicate poverty. Melissa Harris-Perry calls Greg “one of the most consistent voices on poverty in America.” Greg has spoken at numerous conferences and been a guest on Moyers & Company, MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry, Tavis Smiley on PBS, NPR’s Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane, Here & Now, Your Call, The Thom Hartmann Program, Stand Up! with Pete Dominick and The Matthew Filipowicz Show, as well as various local radio programs. His work has also been featured on CBSNews.com, NPR.org, WashingtonPost.com, and BusinessInsider.com. He serves as an advisor for Barbara Ehrenreich’s Economic Hardship Reporting Project. He graduated from Dickinson College and studied creative writing at Miami University (Ohio). He lives in his hometown of Washington, DC, with his wife, son and two daughters.

Articles

News and Features

Amy Treptow came to Washington to tell her story of climbing out of poverty. Some elected officials were more interested than others. 

Ten groups that are laying the foundation for an economic justice revival.

An already-bleak housing and homelessness situation is about to get a lot worse.

Students miss 50 million hours of school each year because of dental problems. A hearing Wednesday confronts the crisis.

In Appalachian Ohio, long lines at food pantries show just how wrongheaded a plan for economic recovery based on cutting assistance to the poor really is.

An interview with Georgetown University law professor Peter Edelman.

The Department of Defense's December review of Afghan strategy glossed over real challenges to the US involvement in the country's political and economic development.

The foreclosure crisis is now hitting even the safest borrowers. That makes passing the Right to Rent Act, which would enable homeowners who can't get loan modifications to stay in their homes, even more critical.

Three working homeowners in Queens faced foreclosure—and JP Morgan Chase refused to modify their mortgages. Now they've brought a lawsuit, and the bank is suddenly responsive.

David Cole on Dawn Johnsen, Greg Kaufmann on Stephen Friedman's windfall profits and Clarissa A. León on Islam Siddiqui, "pesticide pusher"

Blogs

A new report from the Half in Ten campaign demonstrates—once again—that we know what to do to dramatically reduce poverty. The...
Everything you need to know about our so-called “Fiscal Cliff” and the janitors in Cincinnati who are truly living on the edge.
Thirteen corporations in Cincinnati earned nearly $17 billion in profits in 2011, but the janitors cleaning their offices still are paid...
For three months TheNation.com has pushed for a substantive conversation about poverty in the presidential campaign. Today the Obama...
Paul Ryan’s speech on poverty and upward mobility was all stories and spin, and no substance. 
In the second presidential debate, Governor Romney used the word poverty without saying anything of substance about it. President Obama...
There were no questions asked about poverty in the first presidential debate. Here are fifteen suggestions for tonight.
In Wisconsin, a new proposal four years in the making would reduce poverty in the state by at least half—if only there were the...