Quantcast

Greg Kaufmann | The Nation

Greg Kaufmann

Author Bios

Greg Kaufmann

Greg Kaufmann is the former poverty correspondent to The Nation and a current contributor. He serves as an advisor to the Ehrenreich Hardship Reporting Project and the Half in Ten Campaign. Through his writing he seeks to increase media coverage of poverty, share new research, elevate the voices of people living in poverty and offer readers opportunities to get involved with organizations working to eradicate poverty. Melissa Harris-Perry calls Greg “one of the most consistent voices on poverty in America.” Greg has spoken at numerous conferences and been a guest on Moyers & Company, MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry, Tavis Smiley on PBS, NPR’s Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane, Here & Now, Your Call, The Thom Hartmann Program, Stand Up! with Pete Dominick and The Matthew Filipowicz Show, as well as various local radio programs. His work has also been featured on CBSNews.com, NPR.org, WashingtonPost.com, and BusinessInsider.com. He serves as an advisor for Barbara Ehrenreich’s Economic Hardship Reporting Project. He graduated from Dickinson College and studied creative writing at Miami University (Ohio). He lives in his hometown of Washington, DC, with his wife, son and two daughters.

Articles

News and Features

Offering banks incentives to prevent foreclosures isn't working. The Obama administration needs to start mandating mortgage modifications.

While the Obama Administration has taken steps to strengthen enforcement of humane handling and food safety laws, the verdict is still out on whether the USDA has the will to make the changes necessary for a safe and humane food system.

How former New York Fed chair Stephen Friedman made a bundle on the AIG bailout.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner was summoned to testify before the House yesterday to answer two questions: why did he sign off on AIG paying full value on insurance for bad assets, and what was his role in the decision not to disclose that?

On the FCIC's second day of hearings, witnesses examined how Wall Street incentivized and why the Federal Reserve didn't stop subprime lending.

Day 1 of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission didn't find any good answers to the causes of the financial crisis--but don't give up on the commission yet.

Government regulators could insist that mortgage lenders take significant steps to stem the foreclosure crisis--but so far they've refused to.

Representative Marcy Kaptur, a longstanding advocate for foreclosure relief, talks to The Nation about prospects for sweeping financial reform.

Americans want to know what went wrong during last year's economic meltdown. The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission will find the answers.

For the first time, family reunification for same-sex binational couples is being included in broader immigration reform.

Blogs

The history of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers shows us just how much can be accomplished with savvy organizing at the grassroots and...
A hundred and fifty people of faith and furloughed workers marched on the offices of GOP leaders.
GOP proposals to defund Obamacare are the equivalent of a death sentence for thousands of Americans.
The state of things for people in poverty—made worse by the sequester and shutdown—should cause awe in every member of Congress.
Poverty Day--the one day every year when the mainstream media turns its attention to the poor--was last week. Here are five things you...
The new Census data on poverty doesn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know--nothing will change without a formidable...
President Obama speaks eloquently about the economic goals of the March on Washington, but passes up opportunities to stand with low-wage...
Americans across the economic spectrum have a lot in common when it comes to stagnating wages.