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Gary Younge | The Nation

Gary Younge

Author Bios

Gary Younge

Columnist

Gary Younge, the Alfred Knobler Journalism Fellow at The Nation Institute, is the New York correspondent for the Guardian and the author of The Speech: The Story Behind Dr Martin Luther King Jr.'s Dream (Haymarket). His previous books include Who Are We—And Should it Matter in the 21st Century? (Nation Books), Stranger in a Strange Land: Travels in the Disunited States (New Press), and No Place Like Home: A Black Briton's Journey Through the Deep South (Mississippi).

Articles

News and Features

Gautam Malkani's new novel explores the cross-section of youth culture,
heritage and identity in London's polyglot, postcolonial
neighborhoods.

One year later, how will we come to terms with what happened when Hurricane Katrina washed up the disenfranchised most people, including the President, have tried to forget?

A new generation of student activists is flexing its muscles, rolling
back employment rules in France, demanding education reform in Chile
and fighting for immigrant rights in the US.

If democracy represents the will of the people, then there is either
something wrong with democracy in the United States and Britain or something wrong with the people on both sides of the Atlantic.

The candidates for New Orleans mayor--two white, one black--differ
little on the issues. Voters may rely on the symbolism of race, but it
will take more than melanin to rebuild this city.

After nine years, Tony Blair's magic has worn off. His Labour Party has mutated from an imperfect conduit of progressive change into an active obstacle to it.

The American economy cannot function without migrant labor. The paradox
is the country's political culture cannot function without scapegoating
immigrants.

The question raised by cartoons deemed offensive to Islam has
never been whether or not to draw the line but where it
should be drawn.

Socially conservative black churches may be ripe for exploitation by
the Christian right on gay marriage. But that's only part of the story.

Forty years after the now-famous murders of three civil rights workers, racism persists in Mississippi.

Blogs

The process of the handover from Prime Minister Tony Blair toChancellor Gordon Brown has long been scripted. Act I began with the...
So much for freedom of speech, let alone thought. The play My Name Is Rachel Corrie, directed in London by actor Alan Rickman anddue to...