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Eric Alterman | The Nation

Eric Alterman

Author Bios

Eric Alterman

Eric Alterman

Columnist

Eric Alterman is a Distinguished Professor of English, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, and Professor of Journalism at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He is also "The Liberal Media" columnist for The Nation and a fellow of The Nation Institute, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress in Washington, DC, where he writes and edits the "Think Again" column, a senior fellow (since 1985) at the World Policy Institute. Alterman is also a regular columnist for Moment magazine and a regular contributor to The Daily Beast. He is the author of seven books, including the national bestsellers, What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News (2003, 2004), and The Book on Bush: How George W. (Mis)leads America (2004). The others include: When Presidents Lie: A History of Official Deception and its Consequences, (2004, 2005); His Sound & Fury: The Making of the Punditocracy (1992, 2000), which won the 1992 George Orwell Award; It Ain't No Sin to be Glad You're Alive: The Promise of Bruce Springsteen (1999, 2001), which won the 1999 Stephen Crane Literary Award and Who Speaks for America? Why Democracy Matters in Foreign Policy, (1998). His most recent book is Why We're Liberals: A Handbook for Restoring America's Most Important Ideals (2008, 2009).

Termed "the most honest and incisive media critic writing today" in the National Catholic Reporter, and author of "the smartest and funniest political journal out there," in the San Francisco Chronicle, Alterman is frequent lecturer and contributor to numerous publications in the US, Europe and Latin America. In recent years, he has also been a columnist for: MSNBC.com, Worth, Rolling StoneMother Jones, and the Sunday Express (London), a history consultant to HBO films and a senior fellow at Media Matters for America. A former Adjunct Professor of Journalism at NYU and Columbia, Alterman received his B.A. in History and Government from Cornell, his M.A. in International Relations from Yale, and his Ph.D. in US History from Stanford. He lives with his family in Manhattan.

Articles

News and Features

He began his career singing about cars and girls before moving on to empty factories and abandoned quarries—and now, with Wrecking Ball, the depredations of Wall Street.

If their fortunes are ever to revive, liberals must find a way to recapture FDR’s militant and optimistic spirit.

From William Kristol to Condi Rice to Joel Klein, conservatives turn disastrous decisions into fabulous careers. How do they do it?

Intent on blaming the cold war simply on Soviet perfidy, John Lewis Gaddis does a disservice to the subject of his biography—and to his readers.
 

The GOP panders to racists, and liberals are blamed for a “neurotic” obsession with race.

How can it be that the “richest Jew in the world” can buy the foreign policy of a major party’s presidential contender and “the Jews” have somehow escaped the blame?

In today’s media climate, it’s much easier to smear critics of the push for war on Iran as “anti-Semites” than to deal honestly with the facts.

Once again, the MSM falls for the story of Saul Bellow's "former liberal" son, who specializes in publishing right-wing dreck.

Contrary to the spin, New York’s new tax plan privileges millionaires at the expense of the 99 percent.

The MSM’s addiction to false equivalence continues to distort our political debate.

Blogs

A response to Max Blumenthal.
Alterman on Max Blumenthal's Goliath and Reed on how the media enables the govern-by-crisis mentality.
Eric Alterman provides his weekly media round-up and Reed Richardson takes on the false accountability of the American press. 
Eric Alterman's media round-up and Reed Richardson's unique take on the government shutdown. 
Eric Alterman’s weekly media round-up. 
Eric on the best new play in town; and Reed on problems of process journalism.
Eric on the best TV series you have never heard of; and Reed on the sad state of republican politics.
Eric on the Science of Springsteen; and Reed on the perverse influence of Twitter on our political conversations.