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Daniel Singer | The Nation

Daniel Singer

Author Bios

Daniel Singer

Europe Correspondent

Daniel Singer, for many years The Nation's Paris-based Europe correspondent, was born on September 26, 1926, in Warsaw, was educated in France, Switzerland and England and died on December 2, 2000, in Paris.

He was a contributor to The Economist, The New Statesman and the Tribune and appeared as a commentator on NPR, "Monitor Radio" and the BBC, as well as Canadian and Australian broadcasting. (These credits are for his English-language work; he was also fluent in French, Polish, Russian and Italian.)

He was the author of Prelude to Revolution: France in May 1968 (Hill & Wang, 1970), The Road to Gdansk (Monthly Review Press, 1981), Is Socialism Doomed?: The Meaning of Mitterrand (Oxford, 1988) and Whose Millennium? Theirs or Ours? (Monthly Review Press, 1999).

A specialist on the Western European left as well as the former Communist nations, Singer ranged across the Continent in his dispatches to The Nation. Singer sharply critiqued Western-imposed economic "shock therapy" in the former Eastern Bloc and US support for Boris Yeltsin, sounded early warnings about the re-emergence of Fascist politics into the Italian mainstream, and, across the Mediterranean, reported on an Algeria sliding into civil war.

The Daniel Singer Millennium Prize Foundation was founded in 2000 to honor original essays that help further socialist ideas in the tradition of Daniel Singer.

 

Articles

News and Features

We want to change the world, and, therefore, we must ponder why people now have less confidence in the possibility of moving beyond the reign of capital than their ancestors did more than 150 year

President Clinton recently paid a visit to a fallen czar. The blundering Yeltsin may be clinging to his throne, but his effective reign came to a close on August 17, a date to remember.

Is this a dress rehearsal?

"Existence..resistance." "Who sows misery reaps rage." It was with such slogans that some 15,000 highly determined unemployed and their companions marched through this city on January 17.

Can Europe's workers beat unemployment with a shorter week for all?

France used to be described, particularly in the nineteenth century, as the international laboratory in which political ideas were being tested.

Politics in Eastern Europe is puzzling, and not just to outsiders.

As the affluent Seven plus Russia gathered in Denver, American sermons on the virtuous methods to reduce unemployment worked so much on European nerves that even the Continent's conservative pape

Is it still possible to manage existing society in a reformist fashion?