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Daniel Singer | The Nation

Daniel Singer

Author Bios

Daniel Singer

Europe Correspondent

Daniel Singer, for many years The Nation's Paris-based Europe correspondent, was born on September 26, 1926, in Warsaw, was educated in France, Switzerland and England and died on December 2, 2000, in Paris.

He was a contributor to The Economist, The New Statesman and the Tribune and appeared as a commentator on NPR, "Monitor Radio" and the BBC, as well as Canadian and Australian broadcasting. (These credits are for his English-language work; he was also fluent in French, Polish, Russian and Italian.)

He was the author of Prelude to Revolution: France in May 1968 (Hill & Wang, 1970), The Road to Gdansk (Monthly Review Press, 1981), Is Socialism Doomed?: The Meaning of Mitterrand (Oxford, 1988) and Whose Millennium? Theirs or Ours? (Monthly Review Press, 1999).

A specialist on the Western European left as well as the former Communist nations, Singer ranged across the Continent in his dispatches to The Nation. Singer sharply critiqued Western-imposed economic "shock therapy" in the former Eastern Bloc and US support for Boris Yeltsin, sounded early warnings about the re-emergence of Fascist politics into the Italian mainstream, and, across the Mediterranean, reported on an Algeria sliding into civil war.

The Daniel Singer Millennium Prize Foundation was founded in 2000 to honor original essays that help further socialist ideas in the tradition of Daniel Singer.

 

Articles

News and Features

At the turn of the year, the Western media, like
latter-day Columbuses, suddenly discovered that
Europe was speaking with an increasingly strong
German accent. Their surprise was surprising.

CORRECTION: 28 percent of registered voters chose the Islamic Salvation Front. (3/2/92).

"At the burial of communism too many people want to jump from the coffin into the funeral procession." The Polish author of these lines tried to convey the idea that the former practitioners now

The specter haunting Europe today, as it approaches the twenty-first century, is the ghost of nineteenth-century nationalism.

France is still feeling the shock of a legal decision destined to induce collective amnesia.

Los Angeles is not the only place perturbing the sermons of the preachers of history's end and capitalism's eternal youth.

Boris Yeltsin, the former chief apparatchik in Sverdlovsk, and Gennadi Burbulis, the former professor of Marxism-Leninism in the same town, are the men behind the prosecution in the case against

Maastricht--shorthand now for the speeding up of the European Community's financial integration--is both an eye-opener and a mystification.

Boris Yeltsin celebrated the first anniversary of his reign in the mood of a satisfied yet rather puzzled survivor ("we jumped into the river not knowing how to swim...but we didn't drown").

By the skin of their teeth... Watching on French
television the gloomy faces of the alleged winners
one could not help feeling there was an element of
defeat in their victory.