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Daniel Singer | The Nation

Daniel Singer

Author Bios

Daniel Singer

Europe Correspondent

Daniel Singer, for many years The Nation's Paris-based Europe correspondent, was born on September 26, 1926, in Warsaw, was educated in France, Switzerland and England and died on December 2, 2000, in Paris.

He was a contributor to The Economist, The New Statesman and the Tribune and appeared as a commentator on NPR, "Monitor Radio" and the BBC, as well as Canadian and Australian broadcasting. (These credits are for his English-language work; he was also fluent in French, Polish, Russian and Italian.)

He was the author of Prelude to Revolution: France in May 1968 (Hill & Wang, 1970), The Road to Gdansk (Monthly Review Press, 1981), Is Socialism Doomed?: The Meaning of Mitterrand (Oxford, 1988) and Whose Millennium? Theirs or Ours? (Monthly Review Press, 1999).

A specialist on the Western European left as well as the former Communist nations, Singer ranged across the Continent in his dispatches to The Nation. Singer sharply critiqued Western-imposed economic "shock therapy" in the former Eastern Bloc and US support for Boris Yeltsin, sounded early warnings about the re-emergence of Fascist politics into the Italian mainstream, and, across the Mediterranean, reported on an Algeria sliding into civil war.

The Daniel Singer Millennium Prize Foundation was founded in 2000 to honor original essays that help further socialist ideas in the tradition of Daniel Singer.

 

Articles

News and Features

The Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, held in Paris at the end of November, might best be described by reversing Tolstoy's title. This was Peace and War.

At stake in the drama now unfolding in Vilnius is
not just the fate of Lithuania or the Baltic States
but the destinies of Mikhail Gorbachev and perestroika and the immediate future of p

"Comrade democrats--in the widest meaning
of this word--you have scattered. The reformers have gone to ground. Dictatorship is coming....

The Soviet Union can no longer act as a brake on US.
expansion, and Western Europe cannot do so yet.
That is the bitter, bloody and understated lesson of
the current crisis.

The post-Stalinist regimes of Eastern Europe collapsed in part because of the glaring contrast between theory and practice, promise and fulfillment.

Is Italy on the eve of a major political crisis? Is a change
of regime, or perhaps even the birth of a new republic,
imminent?

The sorcerer's apprentices could not even stage a
coup.

"How could anyone possibly say that the October Revolution was in vain?" the poet Tvardovsky angrily told Solzhenitsyn in what now seems another age.

In Maastricht twelve members of the European Community reached another stage on the road toward some form of union, notably with the pledge to introduce a common currency, the ecu, before the end

Forced out of office and deliberately humiliated, Mikhail Gorbachev nevertheless left the historical stage with the dignity of an actor who was aware of the crucial part he had played.