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Barbara Crossette | The Nation

Barbara Crossette

Author Bios

Barbara Crossette

Barbara Crossette is The Nation's United Nations correspondent. A former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, she is the author of several books on Asia, including So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1995 and in paperback by Random House/Vintage Destinations in 1996, and a collection of travel essays about colonial resort towns that are still attracting visitors more than a century after their creation, The Great Hill Stations of Asia, published by Westview Press in 1998 and in paperback by Basic Books in 1999. In 2000, she wrote a survey of India and Indian-American relations, India: Old Civilization in a New World, for the Foreign Policy Association in New York. She is also the author of India Facing the 21st Century, published by Indiana University Press in 1993.

Articles

News and Features

"Mainstreaming" a focus on women into all of the United Nations' work never happened. So will an agency for women ever get off the ground?

Is the campaign to fight female genital mutilation meeting new resistance not only in traditional societies but among Western anthropologists?

Navi Pillay is the first UN human rights commissioner to take on caste discrimination.

Barely a week after Barack Obama plunged into the UN for three unprecedented days, our reconciliation with the organization is already showing fault lines.

At the UN this week, Barack Obama told the world to stop complaining about US hegemony and start working with Washington on big global problems. He should take his own advice.

This week's UN General Assembly session will be memorable not so much for what is said by the lineup of world leaders as for the sustained involvement of one of them: Barack Obama.

In a surprise victory, Bulgarian diplomat Irina Bokova becomes the first female and first Eastern European head of Unesco.

More and more experts now say that climate change and population increase should be viewed together. Local politicians in developing countries often try to heat up the issue.

With the change in Pepfar guidelines, the Obama administration opens new opportunities to link AIDS work and family planning and strengthen health systems in developing countries.

Abdullah Abdullah exemplifies a political chameleon in a country tortured by wars and violence.