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Barbara Crossette | The Nation

Barbara Crossette

Author Bios

Barbara Crossette

Barbara Crossette is The Nation's United Nations correspondent. A former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, she is the author of several books on Asia, including So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1995 and in paperback by Random House/Vintage Destinations in 1996, and a collection of travel essays about colonial resort towns that are still attracting visitors more than a century after their creation, The Great Hill Stations of Asia, published by Westview Press in 1998 and in paperback by Basic Books in 1999. In 2000, she wrote a survey of India and Indian-American relations, India: Old Civilization in a New World, for the Foreign Policy Association in New York. She is also the author of India Facing the 21st Century, published by Indiana University Press in 1993.

Articles

News and Features

The International Criminal Court has had setbacks—but it's already having an impact.

A year after joining the United Nations Human Rights Council, the Obama administration is making an impact. But if Democrats lose control of Congress in November, a new round of isolationism could soon threaten.

The choice of former Chilean president Michelle Bachelet to head the new United Nations agency for women may be the most important and smartest appointment Ban Ki-moon makes in his tenure as UN secretary-general.

Rape is not an inevitable consequence of war, says new UN special representative Margot Wallström. And there's far more UN peacekeeping troops could do to prevent it.

The Obama administration, emerging as a strong voice on international human rights issues within the UN, has submitted its first appraisal of the US's own human rights record.

Anticipating the appointment in the next few weeks of the highest-level United Nations official ever to promote the rights and status of women worldwide, peace advocates are demanding that the new office take on the issue of the unending violence against women in conflict zones.

An eruption of deadly violence in the picturesque countryside and towns of Kashmir is a reminder that many Kashmiris still do not consider themselves part of India, and profess that they never will.

The International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Comission finally won the right to be represented in major meetings at the United Nations—once the US mission showed some muscle on the organization's behalf.

"Gender mainstreaming" at the United Nations failed. Will an agency solely dedicated to promoting women's rights in development do better?