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Barbara Crossette | The Nation

Barbara Crossette

Author Bios

Barbara Crossette

Barbara Crossette is The Nation's United Nations correspondent. A former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, she is the author of several books on Asia, including So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1995 and in paperback by Random House/Vintage Destinations in 1996, and a collection of travel essays about colonial resort towns that are still attracting visitors more than a century after their creation, The Great Hill Stations of Asia, published by Westview Press in 1998 and in paperback by Basic Books in 1999. In 2000, she wrote a survey of India and Indian-American relations, India: Old Civilization in a New World, for the Foreign Policy Association in New York. She is also the author of India Facing the 21st Century, published by Indiana University Press in 1993.

Articles

News and Features

These ten leaders are using their wealth of knowledge to attack a root cause of social dysfunction.
 

The newest UN agency, once hailed as the best hope for action on women’s rights, fell short of money and power this year.

China usually manages to quash UN calls for action on its human rights violations. Not this time.

If Europe's biggest social worry is the integration—or not—of Muslims, nothing would be smarter than positive gestures towards Turkey. Unfortunately, the EU isn't making any.

If Europe’s biggest social worry is the integration—or not—of its Muslim populations, nothing would be smarter than positive gestures towards Turkey. Unfortunately, the EU isn't making any.

Obama was just beginning to repair US-UN relations. Now that Republicans have taken back the House, resurgent cold warriors and neo-isolationists could make 2011 a risky year for internationalism.

The tough and hyper-energetic diplomat’s career spanned more than four decades. He leaves behind a complicated legacy—and in Afghanistan, an unfinished mission.

The new cable dump includes a State Department directive to have diplomats spy on UN officials. The UN has been a playground for spies since its origin—but this recent order goes further than before.

Obama's Asia trip was declared a failure, but that's an oversimplification: it was also a chance for the US to reconnect with India and Indonesia, and there Obama did well.

The tribunal set up to judge surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge regime has been surrounded by squabbles between the Cambodian government and the UN and mired in charges of corruption since its inception.