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Barbara Crossette | The Nation

Barbara Crossette

Author Bios

Barbara Crossette

Barbara Crossette is The Nation's United Nations correspondent. A former foreign correspondent for the New York Times, she is the author of several books on Asia, including So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1995 and in paperback by Random House/Vintage Destinations in 1996, and a collection of travel essays about colonial resort towns that are still attracting visitors more than a century after their creation, The Great Hill Stations of Asia, published by Westview Press in 1998 and in paperback by Basic Books in 1999. In 2000, she wrote a survey of India and Indian-American relations, India: Old Civilization in a New World, for the Foreign Policy Association in New York. She is also the author of India Facing the 21st Century, published by Indiana University Press in 1993.

Articles

News and Features

If and when an inspection and disarmament commission is set up for Syria, can the UN mount a credible and effective mission?

A new campaign against robotic weapons systems is challenging society’s latest threat to peace.

Buddhism is marked by concern for the welfare of all “sentient” creatures. But when it is harnessed to ethnic intolerance and extreme nationalism, it can turn violent.

Socially conservative American Catholics and evangelicals who have led a decades-long campaign against the rights of women in the United States are now gearing up for a season of battles on the bigger global stage.

As the federal government refuses to recognize the UN treaty on the rights of the disabled, a growing number of cities are incorporating international human rights standards into their policymaking.

Southeast Asia has not seen such a dramatic political shift in a generation or more.

Leymah Gbowee, the Liberian who mustered her desperate countrywomen into a peace movement, is attracting international attention as one of Africa’s most powerful voices for social change.

ICC judges found the Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga Dyilo guilty of conscripting children. Will this conviction make a difference?

A new report has found the Assad regime responsible for crimes against humanity. Will it do anything to stop the bloodshed?

These ten leaders are using their wealth of knowledge to attack a root cause of social dysfunction.