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Ari Melber | The Nation

Ari Melber

Author Bios

Ari Melber

Ari Melber

Ari Melber is The Nation's Net movement correspondent, covering politics, law, public policy and new media, and a regular contributor to the magazine's blog. He received a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and a J.D. from Cornell Law School, where he was an editor of the Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy.

Contact Ari: on Facebook, on Twitter, and at amelber@hotmail.com.

Melber is also an attorney, a columnist for Politico and a contributing editor at techPresident, a nonpartisan website covering technology’s impact on democracy. During the 2008 general election, he traveled with the Obama Campaign on special assignment for The Washington Independent.

He previously served as a Legislative Aide in the US Senate and as a national staff member of the 2004 John Kerry Presidential Campaign.

As a commentator on public affairs, Melber frequently speaks on national television and radio, including including appearances on NBC, CNBC, CNN, CNN Headline News, C-SPAN, MSNBC, Bloomberg News, FOX News, and NPR, on programs such as “The Today Show,” “American Morning,” “Washington Journal,” “Power Lunch,” "The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell," "The Joy Behar Show," “The Dylan Ratigan Show,” and “The Daily Rundown,” among others. Melber has also been a featured speaker at Harvard, Oxford, Yale, Columbia, NYU, The Center for American Progress and many other institutions. He has contributed chapters or essays to the books “America Now,” (St. Martins, 2009), “At Issue: Affirmative Action,” (Cengage, 2009), and “MoveOn’s 50 Ways to Love Your Country,” (Inner Ocean Publishing, 2004).  His reporting  has been cited by a wide range of news organizations, academic journals and nonfiction books, including the The Washington Post, The New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, CNN, FOX News, National Review Online, The New England Journal of Medicine and Boston University Law Review.  He is a member of the American Constitution Society, he serves on the advisory board of the Roosevelt Institute and lives in Manhattan.

 

Articles

News and Features

The Administration has come to regard the law as a barrier to security and a literal weapon of our enemies, and sees crime as a legitimate tool to fight terror.

Hillary filibustered them, Obama wooed them, Edwards took them seriously. Now that the Democratic establishment is paying heed, can the netroots remain true to their egalitarian roots?

A netroots political convention in Chicago aims to transcend the horse race and let the people, not the media, frame the questions put to candidates.

MoveOn.org's issue-driven primary may not end up naming a winner, but it's shaping up to be more substantive, thoughtful and participatory than the actual presidential primary.

Matt Stoller, Chris Bowers and Mike Lux have launched a new website designed link progressive outsiders with DC insiders.

Working For Us, a new coalition of unions and Internet activists, seeks to reform the Democratic Party from the ground up.

As America embarks on the longest, most costly presidential race in history, Russ Feingold is asking Congress to apply the brakes.

John Edwards's netroots flap only proves that Democrats should tap into bloggers' energy and learn to manage their passions.

Ambitious politicians don't need a draft to run for higher office, but as "draft" sites become a campaign essential, genuine netroots activists will pay the price.

Progressive "blink tanks" are pressuring Congressional Democrats to work to restore civil liberties lost by passage of Bush's Military Commissions Act.

Blogs

Human rights activists are turning to the popular video site to get their message out.
As Republicans erect more barriers to voting around the country, the Obama campaign says it’s fighting back.
Many Americans think the president came out for gay marriage for political motivations. That could be a good thing.
The most important security and surveillance legislation that you've probably never heard about.
Barack Obama’s general election campaign wasted no time in playing the bin Laden card against Mitt Romney.
How did the media cover the 2012 primary campaign?
Even America’s leading conservative magazine can’t swallow the campaign finance prosecution of John Edwards.
Rick Santorum rose despite a virtual media blackout in 2011, and ultimately fell when it was reinstated.