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Alexander Cockburn | The Nation

Alexander Cockburn

Author Bios

Alexander Cockburn

Columnist

Alexander Cockburn, The Nation's "Beat the Devil" columnist and one of America's best-known radical journalists, was born in Scotland and grew up in Ireland. He graduated from Oxford in 1963 with a degree in English literature and language.

After two years as an editor at the Times Literary Supplement, he worked at the New Left Review and The New Statesman, and co-edited two Penguin volumes, on trade unions and on the student movement.

A permanent resident of the United States since 1973, Cockburn wrote for many years for The Village Voice about the press and politics. Since then he has contributed to many publications including The New York Review of Books, Harper's Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly and the Wall Street Journal (where he had a regular column from 1980 to 1990), as well as alternative publications such as In These Times and the Anderson Valley Advertiser.

He has written "Beat the Devil" since 1984.

He is co-editor, with Jeffrey St Clair, of the newsletter and radical website CounterPunch(http://www.counterpunch.org) which have a substantial world audience. In 1987 he published a best-selling collection of essays, Corruptions of Empire, and two years later co-wrote, with Susanna Hecht, The Fate of the Forest: Developers, Destroyers, and Defenders of the Amazon (both Verso). In 1995 Verso also published his diary of the late 80s, early 90s and the fall of Communism, The Golden Age Is In Us. With Ken Silverstein he wrote Washington Babylon; with Jeffrey St. Clair he has written or coedited several books including: Whiteout, The CIA, Drugs and the Press; The Politics of Anti-Semitism; Imperial Crusades; Al Gore, A User's Manual; Five Days That Shook the World; and A Dime's Worth of Difference, about the two-party system in America.

 

 

Articles

News and Features

Under Karl Rove's deft hand, Bush has been maneuvered from one
catastrophe to another. Why is the left obsessed with him?

Israel's strategy in 1948 continues today: Make life so awful for
Palestinians that most will depart, leaving a few bankrupt ghettos as
memorials to the hopes for a Palestinian state.

The left may be a dusty relic in Germany, but in the Indian state of Kerala,
it has made formidable gains on a platform of reform and smart
economic policies.

While John Kenneth Galbraith was good at pointing out the failures of the free
enterprise system, he could never overcome the play-to-win mentality
of American capitalism.

Bent on proving to the politico-corporate establishment that he
is safe, Barack Obama is backing away from all claims to be a
popular champion.

The war is coming home, in the form of people dreadfully wounded in body and spirit. Yet Democratic candidates aren't too worried about their hawkish stance, because the peace movement has no fire in its belly.

When Democrats ignored Russ Feingold's motion to censure the President,
they provided more evidence that there is no visible national strategy
to end the war and bring the troops home.

It's no surprise to learn that oil companies are underpaying royalties for drilling on public land, or projecting profits in the billions. The battle for energy regulation was lost a long time ago.

Bobwhite quail have little to cheer about these days, their numbers
depleted and habitats ravaged by hunters like the Vice President and
his pals.

The NSA's use of artificial intelligence for "data-mining" surveillance is not only constitutionally illegal, but a technological fantasy. Why aren't the Democrats challenging it?

Blogs

With a new film out about Webb, Kill the Messenger, we look back at Cockburn’s testament to the investigative reporter.