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Fiction

Fiction news and analysis from The Nation

  • July 1, 1999

    The Non-Silence of the Un-Lamblike

    After the success of Infinite Jest in 1996, David Foster Wallace took a vacation from fiction and, perhaps, from fans' expectations with A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again.

    Tom LeClair

  • June 17, 1999

    Eat, Drink and Be Chary

    J.M. Coetzee's new novella, The Lives of Animals, must be some kind of first.

    Benjamin Kunkel

  • June 17, 1999

    Indian Music, Sans Sitar

    I am an artless serf of Cupid. So are you and your mama--but not Vikram Seth.

    Amitava Kumar

  • May 27, 1999

    Emancipation Proclamation

    Upon his death in 1994, Ralph Ellison left behind some 2,000 pages of a never-finished second novel--more than forty years of fine-tuning what his literary executor, John F.

    John Leonard

  • April 29, 1999

    Fading Czech Velvet

    As I'm driven to the home of Ivan Klima, one of the Czech Republic's most internationally respected writers, the hand of fate slips in beside me in the taxi.

    Mark Schapiro

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  • April 21, 1999

    Rushdie as Orpheus, on Guitar

    From the Satanic Versifier, more love and more death, with a song in his heart.

    John Leonard

  • April 15, 1999

    Solzhenitsyn’s History Lesson

    Knowledge of Khrushchev's reaction cited above is personal; he was the author's grandfather.

    Nina Khrushcheva

  • April 1, 1999

    Comic Relief, NEA-Style

    The world is a bleak canvas, all black and white, with only some grays "so that the black and the white [don't] bump into each other so hard." The gods are quarrelsome and bored.

    JoAnn Wypijewski

  • April 1, 1999

    Buddha Leaves Suburbia

    If you adored Catherine Texier's Breakup last year, fell to the floor gushing sympathetic tears for the abandoned raconteur and raised your fists with indignant empathy over the cruelty o

    Minna Proctor

  • February 25, 1999

    Spice Grrrl

    On a trip to Russia in 1995 I was told by the young writers I met there that when a certain famed Soviet novelist returned to his native land, he was an offensive anachronism to them.

    Eileen Myles

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