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Books & the Arts


  • February 25, 1999

    Albright’s State Deportment

    Flirtatious and ferocious at the same time, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright stamps the world stage over Kosovo, threatening fire from heaven if Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic does no

    Ian Williams

  • February 25, 1999

    Oscar Who?

    Although the producers of the Academy Awards ceremony like to boast that a billion people watch their broadcast, I take comfort in knowing that another 5 billion do not.

    Stuart Klawans

  • February 25, 1999

    Spice Grrrl

    On a trip to Russia in 1995 I was told by the young writers I met there that when a certain famed Soviet novelist returned to his native land, he was an offensive anachronism to them.

    Eileen Myles

  • February 25, 1999

    Remember the Alamo, Part II

    On the fourth of August last year in San Antonio, the Alamo rumbled.

    Bárbara Renaud González

  • February 24, 1999

    After Alienation

    Since the collapse of the Berlin wall and the Soviet Union, many on the left seem to have swallowed the idea that there is no alternative to capitalism.

    Daniel Singer

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  • February 24, 1999

    The Prophet Vulgarized

    Trotsky is both the hero of the Russian Revolution--the mastermind of October, the founder of the Red Army--and also its Job, hounded across a "planet without a visa," his family exterminated, hi

    Daniel Singer

  • February 18, 1999

    The Dynasty of Mingus

    For the past year and a half, I've been spending most of my time between 1922 and 1979--the years of Charles Mingus's birth and death, since I'm writing his biography, due to be published next ye

    Gene Santoro

  • February 18, 1999

    So, Is It Back to Bowling Alone?

    The scene with which The Good Citizen opens could have been lifted straight from a Norman Rockwell painting.

    David L. Kirp

  • February 18, 1999

    Nonsilence = Death, Too?

    In seven novels and a collection of essays published since 1981, Sarah Schulman has methodically chronicled the history of her longtime neighborhood, Manhattan's East Village.

    Mark J. Huisman

  • February 18, 1999

    Room With a View

    A man locks his daughters in a one-room house for their first twelve years. The girls--twins--don't attend school; they don't play with other kids. They're never even given a bath.

    Stuart Klawans

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