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Katha Pollitt

Columnist

Katha Pollitt is well known for her wit and her keen sense of both the ridiculous and the sublime. Her “Subject to Debate” column, which debuted in 1995 and which the Washington Post called “the best place to go for original thinking on the left,” appears every other week in The Nation; it is frequently reprinted in newspapers across the country. In 2003, “Subject to Debate” won the National Magazine Award for Columns and Commentary. In 2011, Pollitt won the American Sociological Association Award for Excellence in the Reporting of Social Issues. She is also a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute.

Pollitt has been contributing to The Nation since 1980. Her 1992 essay on the culture wars, “Why We Read: Canon to the Right of Me…” won the National Magazine Award for essays and criticism, and she won a Whiting Foundation Writing Award the same year. In 2013, her column won a Maggie Award from the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, as did her 1993 essay “Why Do We Romanticize the Fetus?”

Many of Pollitt’s contributions to The Nation are compiled in three books: Reasonable Creatures: Essays on Women and Feminism (Knopf); Subject to Debate: Sense and Dissents on Women, Politics, and Culture (Modern Library); and Virginity or Death! And Other Social and Political Issues of Our Time (Random House). In 2007 Random House published her collection of personal essays, Learning to Drive and Other Life Stories. Two pieces from this book, “Learning to Drive” and its follow-up, “Webstalker,” originally appeared in The New Yorker. “Learning to Drive” is anthologized in Best American Essays 2003. It has been made into a movie of the same title, starring Patricia Clarkson and Ben Kingsley. Her most recent book is Pro: Reclaiming Abortion Rights, which The New York Times listed as a Notable Book of 2014.

Pollitt has also written essays and book reviews for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Harper’s, Ms., Glamour, Mother Jones, The New York Times, and the London Review of Books. She has appeared on NPR’s Fresh Air and All Things Considered, Charlie Rose, The McLaughlin Group, CNN, Dateline NBC and the BBC. Her work has been republished in many anthologies and is taught in many university classes.

For her poetry, Pollitt has received a National Endowment for the Arts grant and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her 1982 book Antarctic Traveller won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her poems have been published in many magazines and are reprinted in many anthologies, most recently The Oxford Book of American Poetry (2006). Her second collection, The Mind-Body Problem, came out from Random House in 2009.

Born in New York City, she was educated at Harvard and the Columbia School of the Arts. She has lectured at dozens of colleges and universities, including Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brooklyn College, UCLA, the University of Mississippi and Cornell. She has taught poetry at Princeton, Barnard and the 92nd Street Y, and women’s studies at the New School University.


  • Election 2000March 2, 2000

    Cemetery Road

    Progressives are really grasping at straws these days. First we're supposed to get excited because Ralph Nader is running for President as a Green.

    Katha Pollitt

  • PoliticsFebruary 3, 2000

    Justice for Bernard Baran

    On January 30, 1985, 19-year-old Bernard Baran was convicted of molesting five 3-, 4- and 5-year-old boys and girls at the Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC) in Pittsfield, Massachusetts,

    Katha Pollitt

  • MediaJanuary 6, 2000

    Home Discomforts

    Isn't it curious how often the policy disaster that is posited as the thing that will never happen takes place within minutes?

    Katha Pollitt

  • SocietyNovember 25, 1999

    Prosecuting Innocence

    Like countless parents, Cynthia Stewart of Oberlin, Ohio, is an ardent amateur photographer who loves to take pictures of her child.

    Katha Pollitt

  • Reproductive RightsOctober 28, 1999

    Anti-Choice, Anti-Child

    One of the favorite tactics of pro-lifers--especially ones who are self-described "progressives"--is to accuse abortion rights supporters of being anti-child, hyperindividualistic, unwilling to p

    Katha Pollitt

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  • Fine ArtOctober 14, 1999

    Catholic Bashing?

    My father disapproved of the "Sensation" show at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. He thought it was bad for the Jews.

    Katha Pollitt

  • Criminal JusticeSeptember 18, 1999

    'Finality' or Justice?

    Remember the bizarre daycare center "ritual abuse" trials of the eighties--the McMartin case in Los Angeles, the Little Rascals case in Edenton, North Carolina, the Kelly Michaels case in New J

    Katha Pollitt

  • Gender and SexualitySeptember 16, 1999

    Polymaritally Perverse

    I've always vowed I would never be one of those people--and you know who you are!--who cancel their ACLU membership in a fit of pique over a single issue.

    Katha Pollitt

  • Education ReformSeptember 2, 1999

    Weird Science

    My first thought upon hearing that the Kansas state education board had removed evolution from its mandatory curriculum was: Go ahead! Be like that! Handicap your kids for life.

    Katha Pollitt

  • MediaJuly 8, 1999

    Natural Born Killers

    It didn't take long for the press to connect 21-year-old white-supremacist multikiller Benjamin Smith with the all-purpose explanation du jour: violent entertainment, in this case the computer g

    Katha Pollitt