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Christopher Hayes

Editor at Large

Chris Hayes, Editor-at-Large of The Nation, hosts “All In with Chris Hayes” at 8 p.m. ET Monday through Friday on MSNBC.

Previously, Hayes hosted the weekend program “Up w/ Chris Hayes,” which premiered in 2011. Prior to joining MSNBC as an anchor, Chris had previously served as a frequent substitute host for “The Rachel Maddow Show” and “The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell.” Chris became a MSNBC contributor in 2010 and has been with The Nation since 2007.

He is a former Fellow at Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Foundation Center for Ethics. From 2008-2010, he was a Bernard Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation. From 2005 to 2006, Chris was a Schumann Center Writing Fellow at In These Times.

Since 2002, Hayes has written on a wide variety of political and social issues, from union organizing and economic democracy, to the intersection of politics and technology. His essays, articles and reviews have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The Nation, The American Prospect, The New Republic, The Washington Monthly, the Guardian, and The Chicago Reader.

His first book, Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy, which is about the crisis of authority in American life, was published in June 2012. Chris grew up in the Bronx, graduated from Brown University in 2001 with a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy.


  • February 28, 2008

  • February 28, 2008

    US Prisons: Still #1

    The United States' rapidly metastasizing prison population has reached a new milestone: as the NYT reports, today, more than one in 100 Americans are behind bars.

    For some groups, the statistic is still more grim: one in 36 for Hispanic adults, and one in 9 for black men between the ages of 20 and 34.

    With the onset of the U.S. "war on drugs," across states, the growth rate in prison spending has outpaced every other budget item except healthcare. Since the 1980s, national spending on jails and prisons has swelled by 619 percent, and now stands at an annual $60 billion.

    Christopher Hayes

  • February 28, 2008

    Faulty Helmets? Here’s Another $74 Million

    When it comes to providing helmets for U.S. soldiers abroad, the Defense Department hasn't shown itself to be particularly discriminating in its choice of manufacturers.

    Last December, after secret tapes revealed the North Dakota Sioux Manufacturing Company charged with producing helmets for soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan had knowingly delivered some 2.2 million helmets made with substandard weave, the Defense Department wasn't fazed by the controversy. Rather, 12 days before the pending Justice Department lawsuit was settled (with a $2-million slap on the wrist), the DOD issued another contract to the Sioux Manufacturing Company worth up to $74 million.

    Today, VoteVets.org and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington launched a campaign for Congressional inquiry into the contract. Two whistleblowers from Sioux Manufacturing publicly released their recorded tapes with Sioux Manufacturing employees this morning (available with transcripts here); Sens. Kerry and Clinton have joined them in their call.

    Christopher Hayes

  • February 28, 2008

    The Air Force Wish-List

    To add to its $141-billion spending bonanza in 2009, the Air Force wants another $6 billion for another 120 C-180Js. And another $3.9 billion for 15 C-17s. And, of course, another 381 F-22 Raptors at $160 million apiece (which the Pentagon itself has made clear it doesn't need).

    But maybe a snazzy new ad, paid for by the Air Force's new $81-million PR campaign, will change its mind:

    Christopher Hayes

  • February 28, 2008

    Quote of the Day

    Brock Olivo, former running back for Mizzou and the Detroit Lions on why he's qualified to serve as the congressman from Missouri's 9th district:

    "Not only was I football player, but I also was in social studies class, and I have a passion for how this country works.

    Also: he's never voted before. He's running as a Republican.

    Christopher Hayes

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  • February 28, 2008

    Familiar Ghosts

    A grinning soldier gives a thumbs-up over a greying corpse. Two captives stand nude, shackled wrist-to-wrist. Ten new Abu Ghraib photos from Wired, posted today.

    Christopher Hayes

  • February 28, 2008

  • February 28, 2008

    More Coburn

    Te-Ping's post on Tom Coburn's obstruction of the Genetic Non-DIscrimination Act gives me an opportunity to link this great piece by Ryan Grim in the Politico about how Coburn has, through sheer stubbornness and manipulation of the Senate's arcane decorum, made himself one of the most Senate's most important members. And believe me, this is not a guy you want calling the shots.

    Christopher Hayes

  • February 28, 2008

    Banning Genetic Discrimination

    Rarely does an issue receive such consensus in Washington as that the Genetic Nondiscrimination Act currently enjoys.

    Already, the bill has twice unanimously passed the Senate during the 108th and 109th Congresses; meanwhile last April, the House passed the bill by an overwhelming 420-3 margin. To date, the White House has issued three statements of support of the legislation, which prohibits insurers and employers from discriminating against a person based on genetic information.

    One senator, however, still stands in its way: Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Oklahoma).

    Christopher Hayes