As I’ve done for more than four months, I will be updating news and views on all things WikiLeaks all day, with new items added at the top. All times are ET. Contact me at epic1934@aol.com. Read about or order my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

UPDATED: The Tuesday version of this blog here.

8:50  Ben Smith in PoliticoWhy PJ Crowley "went rogue" at State Dept and lost his job over sticking up for Bradley Manning.  " Crowley – to the occasional dismay of some of his colleagues at State and the White House – had come to view himself as having a special public role. ‘There were times when I thought it was important to push for the United States to take a public stand,’ he said of his time at the podium. ‘I thought it was important to make sure that what we were saying and what we were doing would be consistent with, not only our interest but our values.”’

 

7:20  Fox News’ Shep  Smith: WikiLeaks releases are "the only straight answers we get anymore."  Also: “Wait a minute. You get information that the government’s lying to you again, one more lie from the government! I wish they would publish all of it! Every lie they tell ought to be laid bare!”

4:25  Reuters:  Those cables re: U.S. helping opposition in Syria causing some real issues, so State Dept flack says no big deal, we just support democratic movements everywhere…. This comes after official (unnamed) tells Fox  that fears grow that Syria will kill opponents thanks to documents released.  Certainly unconfirmed.

3:15  Pulitzer Prizes announced — no Wikileaks-related winners, or even finalists.

2:30 We’ve been reporting in past day (see below) on new WikiLeaks “partners” in US—finally, beyond the NYT—McClatchy and the Washington Post. Now one more: the Turtle Bay blog at the Foreign Policy magazine site just announced that it was getting to all the cables (in partnership with the Post) to search for unpublished revelations related to the United Nations. It’s been rare for WikiLeaks to made this available to a blog, but it’s possible that the Post arranged it and then got WikiLeaks approval. Stay tuned.

1:15 We’ve noted previously that James C. Goodale, former chief counsel to NYT, has offered some pointed critiques of the paper’s exec ed Bill Keller, and yesterday the Times Magazine published a condensed letter to the editor from him re prosecution of Assange. Now he has posted online fuller historical precedent details and don’t miss it.

12:55 It’s great that McClatchy folks in DC now have full WikiLeaks trove of cables, although WL has not publicized. It’s especially good becauset they have backbone and, I hear, vare owing not to show cables to State Dept. or anyone else for approval—unlike what NYT did (though of course they will redact names and take other prudent editing steps). I have written widely about the McClatchy crew—then known as Knight Ridder—being the rare standouts in coverage of the lies during the runup to the Iraq invasion. Jonathan Landay and Warren Strobel and others still there, though Clark Hoyt and John Walcott have moved on.

12:40 When I was at Editor & Publisher, we’d have all the Pulitizer finalists days ago, thanks to Joe Strupp, so we’d know who was in the running. Alas, with 3 pm announcement coming today, we are in the dark. But will anyone win for WikiLeaks stuff? If NYT wins for that, will Keller thank “smelly” Assange?

11:35 We’ve mentioned that film short (soon to be full-length, apparently) on Ethan McCord, the soldier in the “Collateral Murder” video who helped two injured children and has spoken out against incident and the war since, would be shown at the Tribeca Film Festival, which opens this week. Now here is its full schedule, as it is being shown five times. It’s twenty-three minutes long for now. Here’s my recent story about McCord.

11:30 Here’s link at National Security Archive on suing the CIA for not releasing the “Official History” of the Bay of Pigs—after half a century. And here’s what my colleague Kevin Gosztola published yesterday to mark the fiftieth anniversary mentions WikiLeaks and Bradley Manning a few times when posing some rhetorical questions.

 

9:20 Reuters with new cables revealing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission acting more as a cheerleader—and salesman—abroad. They “shed light on the way in which U.S. embassies have pulled in the NRC when lobbying for the purchase of equipment made by Westinghouse and other domestic manufacturers. While the use of diplomats to further American commercial interests is nothing new, it is far less common for regulators to be acting in even the appearance of a commercial capacity, raising concerns about a potential conflict of interest.”

7:40 After all the cable revelations, Haaretz editorial: Israeli politicians should think before they speak.

7:00 There was the deadly 2007 incident in Baghdad, the WikiLeaks “Collateral Murder” video, an upcoming documentary on a soldier, Ethan McCord, who helped two injured children that day, and now the song posted to YouTube. It, too, is called “Collateral Murder” and details events on the ground, and McCord’s actions.

12:25 We noted just below that the NYT “monopoly” in the US on access to the WikiLeaks cable trove seems to have been broken in recent days by McClatchy and Wash Post. Just now Wash Post out with big report on cables showing US State Dept. funding Syrian “political opposition groups and related projects, including a satellite TV channel that beams anti-government programming into the country.… The U.S. money for Syrian opposition figures began flowing under President George W. Bush after he effectively froze political ties with Damascus in 2005. The financial backing has continued under President Obama, even as his administration sought to rebuild relations with Assad.”

12:20 New low prices for my book The Age of WikiLeaks in print or as an e-book, or brand-new Bradley Manning: Truth and Consequences as e-book here and print here.

12:10 Bradley Manning: Whistleblower—or scapegoat?

Some praise the likes of Manning and Julian Assange for their courage, while others hate and fear them. Both reactions are understandable. But if, as a society, we scapegoat them, we are only trying to shift our own burden of guilt onto their shoulders, and to think we can get away with that for very long is a dangerous delusion.
Some praise the likes of Manning and Julian Assange for their courage, while others hate and fear them. Both reactions are understandable. But if, as a society, we scapegoat them, we are only trying to shift our own burden of guilt onto their shoulders, and to think we can get away with that for very long is a dangerous delusion.
Some praise the likes of Manning and Julian Assange for their courage, while others hate and fear them. Both reactions are understandable. But if, as a society, we scapegoat them, we are only trying to shift our own burden of guilt onto their shoulders, and to think we can get away with that for very long is a dangerous delusion.

From late Sunday

We’ve long lamented the seeming NYT “monopoly” in the US on the full trove of WikiLeaks cables—considering that the paper quit reporting on them (and showed many of the key ones to US officials before using). Now it seems McClatchy (and the Wash Post, too) is getting them on a regular basis and reporting on them. Latest comes from ace reporter Warren Strobel (one of the the McClatchy, then Knight Ridder team that got the runup to the Iraq war right) on cables on Iran and what they show about US thirst for info and more.

Noted: Bradley Manning’s friend David House has tweeted that he has not visited the brig at Quantico since early March and suggests he is being denied entry.

Lebanon president questions Wikileaks’ cables “credibility.”

More from Haaretz: Herzog also “vilified” Sharon and Peres.