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You may have never heard of True the Vote, but the organization has major plans for upcoming elections across the country.

A spinoff of the King Street Patriots Texas Tea Party, True the Vote aims to have 1 million poll watchers in place by November. 

Barack Obama

A Republican proposal in Pennsylvania would change the way electoral votes are counted—and the results could spell Obama's defeat in 2012.

From Minnesota to Texas to Illinois, the right is using the myth of voter fraud to challenge potentially millions of eligible voters.

Tea Party Activists, the state GOP and Americans for Prosperity are mounting a full-scale assault against unsubstantiated 'voter fraud.'

Juliana Zuccaro and Kelly Kraus thought they were exercising their civic rights and responsibilities on August 31 when, as officers of the Network of Feminist Student Activists at the University

While controversy rages across the country over whether computerized voting machines may result in lost or manipulated votes, there is another change in the election system this year that could l

Electronic counts, unaudited touch-screen ballots, enhance opportunities for fraud.

The Democratic platform approved this week by convention delegates in Boston contains strong language regarding the party's commitment to protect the right of Americans to vote--and have their vo

When Donna Brazile learned in late May that the Justice Department might
sue three Florida counties over voting rights violations that
disfranchised minority citizens in the 2000 presidential election, the
woman who managed Al Gore's presidential campaign called her sister in
Florida's Seminole County. In one of the milder examples of the
harassment suffered by thousands of African-American and Latino voters
in the disputed election, Brazile's sister had been forced to produce
three forms of identification--instead of the one required under Florida
law--before she could cast her ballot.

Informed that the Feds were riding to the rescue eighteen months after
the fact, Brazile's sister asked, "What took 'em so long?" When the
Justice Department finishes its tepid intervention, the question likely
to be asked is, Why did they bother?

When it comes to missing signs of serious trouble, failing to respond to
clear threats and then botching the cleanup of the mess, the Justice
Department's response to the 2000 election crisis has been at least as
inept as the much-criticized terrorist-tracking performance of the FBI
and the CIA. Although it is charged with enforcing Voting Rights Act
protections, Justice was nowhere to be found when its presence could
have made a difference--not just for Florida but for a nation that had
its presidential election settled by a 5-to-4 decision of the US Supreme
Court.

Immediately after the November 7, 2000, election, minority voters who
had never committed crimes complained of having had their names removed
from voting rolls in a purge of "ex-felons," of being denied translation
services required by law, of seriously flawed ballots, of polling places
that lacked adequate resources and competent personnel, and of
harassment by poll workers and law-enforcement officials [see Gregory
Palast, "Florida's 'Disappeared Voters,'" February 5, 2001, and John
Lantigua, "How the GOP Gamed the System in Florida," April 30, 2001].
But after newspaper analyses uncovered evidence of disproportional
disfranchisement of minority voters, and even after a US Commission on
Civil Rights review condemned Florida's Governor, Jeb Bush, and its
Secretary of State, Katherine Harris, for running an election marked by
"injustice, ineptitude and inefficiency," another year passed before
Assistant Attorney General Ralph Boyd told the Senate Judiciary
Committee in May that the civil rights division was preparing to act.

"Act" is a generous characterization. Eleven thousand election-related
complaints have been whittled down to five potential lawsuits--targeting
three Florida counties, along with St. Louis and Nashville. The Florida
suits focus on the failure of Miami-Dade, Orange and Osceola county
officials to provide Spanish- and Creole-language assistance to voters.
Issues of accessibility for the disabled and flawed registration
procedures are also likely to be addressed. And, encouragingly, Boyd
told the Judiciary Committee that his department would examine the
purging of eligible voters from election rolls in a process overseen by
Harris's office.

But don't expect to see Harris--now a Congressional candidate--in court
anytime soon. Boyd wants to settle his suits before they are filed,
through negotiations with local officials. That will bring limited
reform to three of Florida's sixty-seven counties and perhaps a bit more
restraint on the part of the Republican-controlled Secretary of State's
office. There is no real evidence, however, that John Ashcroft's Justice
Department is going to call anyone in Florida--least of all the
President's brother or his political allies--to account for the
widespread disfranchisement of minority voters.

Justice Department attorneys continue to limit the scope of an
investigation that should be examining the collapse of voting rights
protections in all Florida counties, from Palm Beach in the south to
Duval in the north and Gadsden in the west--where as many as one in
eight ballots cast by minority voters was discarded. In addition, Jeb
Bush and the Florida legislature continue to reject needed reforms and
to stall the allocation of sufficient funds to bring voting machinery in
predominantly minority precincts up to par with equipment in
predominantly white precincts. And the US House and Senate remain
deadlocked over legislation that would promote and fund reforms in other
states--like Illinois, which had a higher rate of ballot spoilage than
Florida. Until the Justice Department and state and federal legislators
get serious about making real reforms, the 2002 and 2004 elections won't
be any more fair or functional than the flawed election of 2000.

Blogs

The newest challenge to voting rights would be a dramatic powergrab for the GOP. 

May 28, 2015

One of the nation’s leading advocates for voting rights, fair elections, and amending corporate cash out of politics wants to shake up the House.

April 20, 2015

The Supreme Court says GOP-drawn redistricting maps in Alabama may be unconstitutional racial gerrymanders.

March 25, 2015

One of the country's most restrictive voter ID laws will now be in effect.

March 23, 2015

The right to vote is under the greatest threat since the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

March 5, 2015

Pushing this country forward takes more than a sympathetic president.

January 8, 2015

It took MLK’s activism and LBJ’s leadership to pass the Voting Rights Act.

January 8, 2015

Poet Crystal Valentine: “Maybe politics aren’t Armageddon enough for us”

December 22, 2014

DOJ’s aggressive defense of voting rights is one of the most important aspects of Holder’s tenure.

September 25, 2014

The federal government and civil rights groups want the state's anti-voting law blocked before the 2014 midterms. 

July 7, 2014