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Most Americans are probably
unaware that "the Dark Ages were not all bad and the Enlightenment
not all good." Or that "homosexuality [is] a sin worthy of death." Or
that one of the greatest threats to the country is "the Feminization
of American Life." Or that we should still be debating the question:
"Who Was Right in the War Between the States: the Union or the
Confederacy?"

If you are active with the Christian
fundamentalist organization American Vision, however, this is
mainstream thinking--or, more precisely, the thinking you hope to
force down the throat of the mainstream. The Georgia-based group's
president, Gary DeMar, preaches about "the necessity of storming the
gates of hell" and cleansing public institutions of "secularism,
atheism, humanism, and just plain anti-Christian sentiment." He may
soon be dispatching a prominent foot soldier to do just that. J.
Robert Brame III, American Vision's board secretary, reportedly tops
President Bush's list of likely appointees to the National Labor
Relations Board, the five-member agency that determines the fate of
workers seeking union recognition and helps define how federal law
protects women, gays and lesbians, and others seeking representation
in the workplace.

Brame, a management lawyer, previously
served on the board from 1997 to 2000. Technically appointed by Bill
Clinton, he was actually a choice forced upon the former President by
Senate Republicans who refused to act on Clinton's appointments
unless he gave Brame the job. During those three years, Brame was the
most frequent dissenter from the board's pro-labor decisions. He
opposed moves to make it easier for temporary workers, graduate
students and medical interns and residents to unionize. He was a
lonely advocate of steps to limit the ability of unions to use dues
money to pay for organizing. Brame even complained about NLRB rulings
that "facilitate union organizing in the modern work
place."

Brame's record, his association with American
Vision and the very real prospect that he could end up chairing a
Bush-appointed NLRB majority by the end of the year have energized
opponents. Taking the lead is the gay and lesbian labor group Pride
at Work, which aims, says interim executive director Marta Ames, "to
make enough noise so that Bush decides it's not worth it to appoint
someone who is associated with the viewpoint that LGBT people are
'monsters' who should be stoned."

"Gays and lesbians,
women, people of color and young people are harassed on the job all
the time, and that harassment becomes vicious when we're trying to
organize into unions," says Sarah Luthens, a Seattle union organizer
active with the Out Front Labor Coalition. "To think that someone
like Brame would be in a position to decide whether that harassment
represents a violation of labor laws that are already too weak is
horrifying."

The brother of the Sultan of Brunei
Set out to see how much a guy could buy,
And fifteen billion's what he finally spent
Before the sultan voiced some discontent.
The guilt of many shoppers was assuaged.
The most committed shopaholic gauged,
"I'd really have to spend a lot more dough
To be a spendthrift like the sultan's bro."

The creation of the atom bomb is the greatest revolution ever accomplished in science--and unquestionably the most frightening.

On the eightieth anniversary of the riot in that city, we commemorate the report written for this magazine by a remarkable journalist.

Despite statements to the contrary, the rule is resulting in tragic circumstances for women abroad.

Durbin, South Africa, will see the coming together of a large cohort with its own pressing agenda.

Daniel Patrick Moynihan is a disappointment to those who counted on him to uphold the banner
of ethical social change.

Puerto Ricans of all stripes question the Navy's presence there.

Should the question of personhood at the embryo stage really be decided by politicians?
 

Not every citizen has accepted the Court's momentous presidential decision.

Blogs

This is not a personal conduct policy. It is an amateurish, pandering, and altogether odious exercise in public relations.

September 17, 2014

Janay Rice is being revictimized by the media.

September 16, 2014

Will Koch-allied trustees, state-appointed superintendents or President Obama ever listen to students?

September 15, 2014

Appearing on Democracy Now! Monday morning, Lee Fang discussed "Who's Paying the Pro-War Pundits?"—his latest for The Nation.

September 15, 2014

Long-acting reversible contraceptives could revolutionize reproductive healthcare—if only politicians would get out of the way.

September 15, 2014

Either neither of them have a place on college campuses, or both do. 

September 15, 2014

If the NFL wants to truly change, and not just clean up its image, it should fire Roger Goodell and replace him with forward-thinking football insiders.

September 15, 2014

VAWA has sparked real progress—but we can do more to ensure that survivors have stable jobs and housing.

September 12, 2014

The word “homeland,” he says, will “get us further into wars."

September 12, 2014

There’s debate over whether federal government involvement will make a difference in Ferguson. Cincinnati, site of a police shooting in 2002, offers clues on how to address racially biased policing.

September 12, 2014