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Nation Topics - Race and Religion

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Debbie Nathan is an attendee of Feminist Futures, a
New York-based study group whose organizers include Leonore Tiefer.

There's a joke circulating on the Internet: A grandmother overhears her
5-year-old granddaughter playing "wedding." The wedding vows go like
this: "You have the right to remain silent.

Even after twenty-five years, the bitter taste of Argentina's "dirty war" lingers.

With the 1996 welfare law expiring this fall, Congressmembers would do
well to stop congratulating themselves on its alleged successes and turn
their attention to the glaring failures of the ne

Any fan who over the years has attended a baseball game at Boston's
Fenway Park notices how few African-Americans are in the stands.

This book makes a good case for racism--the word, not the ideology. What
necessitated a defense?

That the abused child will defend its parent is no arcane phenomenon of child psychology--hell, we've seen it on Law and Order.

The Indian state is criminally culpable for the murder of Muslims in Gujarat.

Admiral James Loy, the nation's top aviation security official, confirmed at an August 22 press conference what thousands of immigrant airport screeners have dreaded for nearly a year. Loy promised that the Transportation Security Administration would without question meet the Congressionally mandated deadline to replace America's 30,000-member screener force with government-trained federal employees.

For Loy to accomplish this task, the TSA must remove an estimated 8,000 immigrant screeners from security checkpoints by November 19 because they fail to meet the new citizenship requirement. "The law of the land is the law of the land," Loy replied, when asked how the TSA justifies the impending shakeout at a time when the agency is scrambling to train and place an additional 16,000 employees at airports nationwide over the next eleven weeks.

Indeed, Loy is merely obeying the demands of Congress. Signed into law following a post-September 11 flurry, the Aviation and Transportation Security Act created the TSA and charged the agency with placing airport security under federal jurisdiction. Section 111 of the ATSA requires US citizenship for all screeners, which sets the absurd precedent that immigrants can join the military (no citizenship required) but not scan sneakers at airline security posts.

Both the TSA and members of Congress offer careful replies when it comes to explaining the reasons for the citizenship requirement. An aide for Senator John McCain, one of the ATSA's main proponents, did not want to comment on the provision's rationale. The Justice Department, however, came close to touching on the truth in a motion to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of nine screeners trying to keep their jobs. "It bears repeating that the ATSA was passed in the aftermath of an attack on the US by non-citizens, who penetrated the US aviation system," the motion stated.

The case, Gebin v. Mineta, names Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta and his former No. 2, John Magaw (who was replaced by Loy), as the defendants. Federal Judge Robert Takasugi promised a decision on the case in early June but still has not issued a ruling.

All nine plaintiffs are noncitizens, lawfully living in the country as permanent residents. The lead plaintiff, Jeimy Gebin, believes that her three years in the US Army should be enough to allow her to stay employed at Los Angeles International Airport. Erlinda Valencia, a leader of the San Francisco airport's screening force, is another plaintiff. Two years ago Valencia's security firm honored her when she detected a toy hand grenade and two weeks later, a loaded handgun. But federal attorneys argue that the government can do as it pleases with its "alien guests," and that Congress acted rationally when, in the interest of airport security, it required screeners to formalize
their "loyalty" and "commitment" through citizenship.

The situation between the government and immigrant screeners begs the comparison of Japanese-Americans who were fired from their jobs after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, and were then herded into internment camps. Ironically, Secretary Mineta and Judge Takasugi were among those interned.

In addition to being unfair to immigrants, dismantling experienced screening units at the nation's 429 commercial airports could itself be a major security risk. By the November deadline, 80 percent of San Francisco International Airport's 915 screeners will be forced out of their jobs because they are not citizens. Washington-Dulles will also lose 80 percent of its existing force;
Los Angeles International Airport will lose 40 percent; and Miami
International Airport will lose 70 percent. Even worse, their replacements
are being whisked through the training process: one new screener working at the Norfolk, Virginia, International Airport told Alan Gathright of the San Francisco Chronicle that he received only fifteen minutes of explosive detection training. There is also the matter of how the remaining 40,500 screeners waiting to be hired will complete the federally mandated 100 hours of classroom and onsite instruction before they begin work in late November.

While it is true that most federal employees and civil servants must be US citizens, screeners arrived on the job without this requirement; and the ATSA does not "grandfather" exemplary workers into the applicant pool for a federal screening position. "I am a legal immigrant. Now they are trying to make me a second-grade citizen," said Ashok Malakar, a San Francisco screener who is only a year from naturalization. "That is discrimination."

An antigay ballot initiative spurs some surprising political
coalitions.

Blogs

The city becomes the first in the nation to say 'no' to bans on sex-selective abortions.

September 19, 2014

Corporal punishment is an extension of respectability politics, the idea that when people of color behave “correctly,” racism can be overcome.

September 19, 2014

Forty days after Officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, America’s “justice system” continues to fail.

September 18, 2014

There’s debate over whether federal government involvement will make a difference in Ferguson. Cincinnati, site of a police shooting in 2002, offers clues on how to address racially biased policing.

September 12, 2014

New witnesses to the Michael Brown killing say he had his hands up when he was shot by police.

September 11, 2014

Senator Claire McCaskill will convene a hearing on Tuesday before a Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs subcommittee.

September 8, 2014

Increased police presence won‘t make “bad kids” any better.

September 5, 2014

From making a donation to watching a video to sharing your own story, here are six ways you can support young people at the forefront of the fight for racial justice.

September 4, 2014

If you’re asking the question “Where is the movement?” you simply haven’t been paying attention.

August 28, 2014

Residents of Canfield Green Apartments have been faced with tremendous challenges in the aftermath of the killing of Michael Brown—many a direct result of actions taken by the police.

August 27, 2014