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Not only Democrats but many Greens oppose a Nader run in 2004.

To gauge the level of hatred entertained by liberals for the Bush
Administration, take a look at the bestseller lists.

A day before the International Committee of the Red Cross announced it
would reduce its presence in Iraq because the country was becoming
increasingly dangerous, President Bush said he would ru

There will be a presidential election in a year, and it will come as no
surprise that we hope Election Night 2004 ends early with the defeat of
George W. Bush.

Even as the labor leaders who support him are redoubling efforts to
secure the Democratic presidential nod for Dick Gephardt, it is becoming
increasingly clear that the former House minority le

As the 2004 election draws nearer and George W. Bush's poll numbers grow
shakier, White House operatives are devoting themselves to coddling the
religious right.

During the two years when he was exploring a bid for the 2000 Democratic
presidential nomination, Paul Wellstone spent a lot of time trying to
figure out how a progressive could get elected to

Democrats can win the farm and small-town vote--if they pay
serious attention.

Twelve years ago, Harris Wofford made healthcare an issue. Promising to
fight for coverage for all, Wofford scored a surprise victory in a
Pennsylvania Senate race--inspiring speculation that a President named
Bush could be beaten in 1992. Wofford handed the issue to Bill Clinton,
who won the election but lost the war by proposing a plan that offered
more in the way of bureaucracy than a clean break with the existing
for-profit system. Since the Clinton crackup, Democrats have struggled
to reassert the healthcare issue. While the 2004 campaign has yet to
experience a "Wofford moment," Dr. Norman Daniels of the Harvard School
of Public Health says rising numbers of uninsured and underinsured
should move healthcare to the fore as an issue. "The question," he says,
"is whether the new crop of candidates will address it effectively."

Enter Representative Jim McDermott, a physician and the new president of
Americans for Democratic Action, who has taken it on himself to sort
through candidate proposals (www.adaction.org). As McDermott sees it,
the plans of Howard Dean, John Edwards, John Kerry and Dick Gephardt
"are all quite similar--they each combine modest expansions of public
sector programs such as Medicaid and [children's health programs] with
private sector initiatives to encourage employers to provide health
insurance for their employees." While under each of these plans the
government becomes an even greater purchaser of healthcare, McDermott
says that "because most of the new expenditures are through the
fragmented private insurance market, the government will continue to
waste its considerable market power." He's still reviewing Lieberman's
plan, which looks to resemble the others.

In contrast, McDermott notes, Representative Dennis Kucinich offers a
single-payer national healthcare plan based on a bill by Representative
John Conyers, of which McDermott is a co-sponsor. While he sees value in
incremental reforms, McDermott says, "I continue to believe that a
national health care plan, with a government-guaranteed revenue stream
for providers, would be most effective in providing universal coverage
and controlling costs while guaranteeing high quality care." A separate
study of the candidate proposals, done by The Commonwealth Fund
(www.cmwf.org), says Kucinich's plan would cover all Americans, while
those of Lieberman, Dean, Gephardt, Kerry and Edwards would leave 9
million to 19 million uninsured. Single-payer backers Al Sharpton and
Carol Moseley Braun have not offered details; Gen. Wesley Clark has yet
to make his views clear.

While McDermott's analysis will please Kucinich backers, his candidate
choice won't. The Congressman just endorsed Dean. Two reasons, he says.
First, "as governor of Vermont, Dean implemented reforms. He got people
covered. One of the problems the Clintons had is that they were starting
without ever having done it. For them, it was theoretical. Experience
helps you avoid big mistakes." Second, "Electability. Dean isn't my
perfect candidate, but I think he can beat Bush. Beating Bush is the
first step toward healthcare reform."

The press seems to think Kucinich isn't serious precisely because he's
serious.

Blogs

Most of the candidates likely to contend for the presidency in 2016 have been silent—even Hillary Clinton, who’s been otherwise eager in recent weeks to opine extensively on national issues.

August 20, 2014

Warren’s Netroots Nation speech was populist, progressive and specific. The base cheered. Party leaders should listen.

July 19, 2014

A potential 2016 presidential candidate adds a moral message—and tone—to discourse.

July 15, 2014

Senator Sanders is considering a presidential bid. Activists want him to consider his political options.

May 12, 2014

Janet Yellen admits evidence of how inequality is “very worrisome.”

May 7, 2014

A Fighting Chance is a poignant, populist book that frames a direction for Democrats.

April 23, 2014

As right-wingers highlight GOP presidential prospects in New Hampshire, the independent senator draws a packed house and standing ovations for the progressive alternative.

April 11, 2014

She's teaching her party how to take the events of a moment and weave them into a narrative that addresses the fundamental challenges facing the country.

April 8, 2014

Vermont independent wants to talk to progressives about a 2016 run, about whether to do so as a Democrat. “If I run,” he says, “my job…is to build the kind of coalition that can win—that can transform politics.”

March 6, 2014

Fallout from release of emails of convicted aides damages Wisconsin governor’s presidential prospects.

February 19, 2014